Logos Bible Software Resource Discounts for March 2019

Logos runs sales on books and collects every month and there is plenty of good books available with decent discounts. There are dozens of books and sets on sale, here are a few highlights, ranging from the affordable to the less-affordable. They have a few Community Bid items in the list, such as all twenty-two volumes of Plutarch’s Lives for $30 of the thirty-six volumes of the Select Works of Cicero for $55 (compare that to the Loeb editions at $15-18 used if you can find them). Although I much prefer to have the real paper versions of books, the discounts on some of these items are good enough they are hard to pass up.

There are many more books in biblical, theological, and historical studies, as well as Christian Living, Church Life, and a few random “staff picks.” These are the books which caught my eye, visit the sale page yourself and see what yo can find.

Larry Hurtado, Honoring the Son: Jesus in Earliest Christian Devotional Practice(Lexham, 2018), $9.99. I reviewed this book soon after it was published.

As David Capes says in his introduction to this slender volume, “behind each paragraph is an article or monograph. . .” (ix). In fact, the body of this book is a mere sixty-eight pages plus another seven pages of appendix, eleven pages of bibliography and five pages of indices. But brevity should not be mistaken for sketchiness. Hurtado succeeds in summarizes and updated the arguments made in his earlier and more substantial works and provides enough bibliographical material to enable the reader to explore the details of the argument of the book. The book is written to appear to layperson, student and professional interested in the development of a high Christology in the early church.

David Clines, The Theme of the Pentateuch (Second Edition; Sheffield Academic, 1997), $13.99 (currently $30+ on Amazon). I read the first edition of this book and have used the basic thesis of the book for my OT Lit classes for more that twenty years.

Donald E. Gowan,Theology in Exodus: Biblical Theology in the Form of a Commentary (WJKP, 1994), $19.95. I have enjoyed several other works by McGowen, but I have not read this one. Having just taught through Exodus, this biblical theology of Exodus might be a good read.

H. G. M. Williamson, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Isaiah 6-12 (T&T Clark,2018), $24.95 (cheap paperback version on Amazon for $39.95, hardbacks are $100+). This is the second part Williamson’s ICC Commentary on Isaiah, and well worth the money for a professional, high end commentary on Isaiah.

I am quite interested in the Sheffield Academic Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls (12 vols). At only $85, this is an excellent value. The collection includes Geza Vermes’ The Dead Sea Scrolls in English (1995) as well as his brief Scrolls, Scriptures and Early Christianity. There are also introductions to The Damascus Texts, The Exegetical Texts, The Purity Texts, The Temple Scroll and Related Texts and The War Texts (1 QM and Related Manuscripts).

There are several bundles of Library of Hebrew Bible texts from the Journal for the Study of OT or NT Supplement series. For example, the Library of Hebrew Bible/OT Studies: JSOTS on Nevi’im (7 vols.) is $84.99; T&T Clark Old Testament in the New Testament Collection (15 vols.) is a bit more of an investment at $179.99. The set includes The Followers of Jesus as the ‘Servant’: Luke’s Model from Isaiah for the Disciples in Luke-Acts by Holly Beers (which I reviewed for RBL) and both volumes of Brian J. Abasciano’s Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9 (which I have used extensively and highly recommend).  These professional monographs are often the publication of a doctoral dissertation or collections of essays from an SBL session. Although some readers will balk at the high price of these collections, the hardback editions usually run $125 per volume, when they are released in paperback they are still in the $40 range.

Another pricey reference book which works great in the Logos ecosystem in The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek (Brill, 2015, $89.99). This new lexicon (sometimes called BrillDAG) was on sale at the last SBL for $99 in print, but it is a much better tool in Logos since you can link directly from the Greek New Testament to the lexicon entry.  From the book blurb, “translation of Franco Montanari’s Vocabolario della Lingua Greca. With an established reputation as the most important modern dictionary for Ancient Greek, it brings together 140,000 headwords taken from the literature, papyri, inscriptions and other sources of the archaic period up to the 6th Century CE, and occasionally beyond.” Here is a link for a review of this lexicon on Bryn Mawr Classical Review.

Logos recently launched a major upgrade, I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything runs faster than Logos 7 so the upgrade is well worth getting.  If you do not already have Logos, get Logos 8 Fundamentals for $99 then upgrade to a Logos 8 base package. Try using the code READINGACTS8, might save you some money.

The Logos Bible Software Free and almost free books of the month are three excellent books by Leland Ryken. Ryken was professor of English at Wheaton College written extensively on classic literature from a Christian perspective, including the The Christian Imagination: The Practice of Faith in Literature and Writing and the classic How to Read the Bible as Literature (Zondervan 1984). Ryken served as the “literary stylist” for the English Standard Version (Crossway 2001) and was edited IVP’s Dictionary of Biblical Imagery (1998). Like the March sale, the free and almost free books expire at the end of this month.

In case you have not seen the announcements, Logos released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will require you to mortgage your house.

These discounts expire at the end of March, so head to the sale page and load up on excellent professional resources for your Logos library.

 

Eerdmans Sale on Kindle Books for March 2019

During the month of March, Eerdmans has some great deals on Kindle versions of recent publications

Although I prefer real books to digital (and Logos books to Kindle), these are worth buying for a few bucks. If you do not own a Kindle device, you can get an App on most devices to read Kindle books. I use the iPad Kindle App, it is very convenient for travel (or reading in the dark, if you are into that).

I think the highlight of this month’s sale is J. R. Daniel Kirk, A Man Attested by God: The Human Jesus of the Synoptic Gospels. James McGrath said “This may well be the most important book about New Testament Christology to appear in recent years.” Kirk argues against the idea the Gospels present Jesus as divine, but rather he is a idealized human similar to other ideal humans (Moses, Elijah, etc.) It is a challenging book, well worth reading and considering his arguments.

There are quite a few others, so poke around the Eerdmans books on Amazon and see what you can find.

The sale runs through the end of March 2019.

Anchor Bible Commentary for Logos Sale

Logos is running a great sale on volumes of the Yale Anchor Bible Commentary through the end of February 2019. All volumes of this series are only $19.95, including the most recent volumes. For example both volumes of Joel Marcus’s commentary on Mark are on sale for $19.95 each; the cheaper paperback versions cost nearly that much per volume (and new hardcovers are selling for up to $85!)  I really do prefer to have the real books, but at this price I can fill in some of the recent replacement volumes I have not been able to afford and use the features of the Logos library.

So what is good in the AB series? Joel Marcus on Mark, Fitzmyer on Luke (two volumes), Acts, Romans and 1 Corinthians are all worth using. Raymond Brown’s two volumes on the Gospel of John and addition volume on the Epistles of John are still worth using although they are a bit dated. The real steal is Louis Martyn’s Galatians commentary, new paperback copies are more that $50 on Amazon. Abraham Mahlerbe on 1-2 Thessalonians and Luke Timothy Johnson on 1-2 Timothy are both excellent.

For the Hebrew Bible, I recommend Jacob Milgrom’s three volumes on Leviticus (Vol. 1, 1–16, Vol. 2, 17-22 and Vol. 3, 23–27; one of the most detailed commentaries on Leviticus!) Both the Hosea and Amos commentaries by Anderson and Freedman are great (I have used Amos often). I have two of the three Joseph Blenkinsopp commentaries on Isaiah and find them useful.

The Anchor Bible Commentary included books from the Apocrypha as well. Most of these can be had used for less than $20, but there are relatively few commentaries on Sirach, Judith, Tobit, etc.

There are a few of the older AB commentaries on sale and I would not recommend them even at the sale price. I would not purchase the Genesis commentary by Speiser, for example. It is one of the original AB volumes and has yet to be replaced by a newer more detailed commentary. There are used copies everywhere for less that $10 (I see a copy on Amazon for less that $3!) The same is true for 1-2 Chronicles and the Ezra-Nehemiah volumes by Jacob Myers. Maybe the three volumes on the Psalms by Michael Dahood are in this category too, although these were better commentaries with a heavy emphasis on Ugaritic parallels. Despite being older, I think Marvin Pope’s commentaries on Job and Song of Solomon are both worth having (the SoS commentary is massive and filled with interesting interpretations of the Song!). The William Orr commentary on 1 Corinthians so not very good and has been replaced by Fitzmyer, but it is still available in this sale (you can get it used for $2 on Amazon). J. Massyngberde Ford’s Revelation commentary was replaced by Craig Koester. Ford’s commentary was brief and idiosyncratic (and is still pricey used, for some reason).

Logos recently launched a major upgrade, I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything runs faster than Logos 7 so the upgrade is well worth getting.  If you do not already have Logos, get Logos 8 Fundamentals for $99 then upgrade to a Logos 8 base package. Try using the code READINGACTS8, might save you some money.

The Anchor Bible Commentary sale expires at the end of February, so head to the Sale page and load up on excellent professional commentaries for your Logos library.

 

Eerdmans Sale on Kindle Books

During the month of February, Eerdmans has some great deals on Kindle versions of recent publications.  Although I prefer real books to digital (and Logos books to Kindle), these are worth buying for a few bucks (the price of one of those fancy coffees you like so much).

There are quite a few others, so poke around the Eerdmans books on Amazon and see what you can find.

The sale runs through February 28, 2019.

Logos Bible Software Upgrade Sale Ends Soon

In case you have not seen the announcements, Logos Bible Software released a major upgrade at the end of last year. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything runs faster than Logos 7 so the upgrade is well worth getting.

If you upgrade to Logos 8, you can save 25% on any upgrades to Logos 8 and pick five free books. Follow the link and used the code READINGACTS8 and save a little money on the upgrade. But this upgrader discount ends on February 7, 2019. If you do not already have Logos, here is a loophole in the sale. Get Logos 7 Fundamentals for $59 then upgrade to a Logos 8 base package and use the code to save 25%.

As always, be sure to check out the Logos Free Book of the Month. They give away a new book every month and usually have promotional pricing on one or two others from the same publisher. This is a great way to build up your library.

Jesus the Bridegroom only $4.99 in the Logos Bible Software Library

I was quite surprised today with a tweet from a former student who bought my book, Jesus the Bridegroom for the Logos Bible Software for $4.99. This is part of the Wipf & Stock sale through Logos which (I assume) runs through the end of November 2018.

Jesus the Bridegroom has been reviewed in a couple of places. Marianne Blickenstaff reviewed the book for SBL’s Review of Biblical Literature (click here to read the review) and Peter Leithart reviewed the book at First Things a bit earlier. Don K. Preston reviewed the book at Amazon, saying he loves “the research that went into this. While Dr. Long’s emphasis is on ‘source’ and my focus is on theology, Nonetheless, I did find this book to be very helpful. I particularly appreciated the linguistic studies, showing the marital language that is used in some texts (e.g. especially Isaiah 4-5) that I had never seen before, and I truly appreciated it. His inter-textual notations were also fruitful. Long’s conclusion that Jesus drew together several strands of Jewish thought, and conflated those strands into a harmonious message, thus, suggesting that Jesus stood well within the framework of a Jewish prophet, is very good”

The book is also available through Amazon and the Wipf & Stock website (the retail price is $33 but there are discounted copies at Amazon and Wipf & Stock). The Kindle version is only $9.99 and claims to have real page numbers, but I cannot see them reading the book with the Kindle App on an iPad. Still, the book looks great in Kindle.

Obviously I would love for you to buy a copy, but I know that is not always possible. Here’s how you can help get the word out for me:

  • Buy the book while it is on sale at Logos, it is only $4.99!
  • Request that the book be added to your college, university, or seminary library.
  • Leave a review on Amazon.com. I cannot stress this enough, it is very difficult to get people to leave a review on Amazon, but the sad fact is Amazon reviews count for something in today’s book buying world.

What is the book about? The full title of the book is Jesus the Bridegroom: The Origin of the Eschatological Feast as a Wedding Banquet in the Synoptic Gospels. The book is an edited version of my dissertation. As I was working on my dissertation, people would ask what I was writing on. I usually said “an intertextual study on messianic banquet imagery in the Synoptic Gospels.” After a moment of awkward silence, I clarified: “Jesus said the Kingdom of Heaven is like a Wedding Banquet – what’s up with that?”

The book attempts to study the marriage metaphor / motif in the teaching of Jesus. There are a few places in the Synoptic Gospels where Jesus describes the Kingdom of Heaven as a Wedding Banquet, Matt 22:1-14 and 25:1-13 are the most obvious texts. But there are a few places where Jesus describes himself as a bridegroom, and a marriage metaphor appears in a number of other places. My proposal is that Jesus combined the metaphor of an eschatological banquet with the common Old Testament marriage metaphor and described his ministry as an ongoing wedding banquet to which all Israel is now invited. The long period in the wilderness is over and it is time for Israel to return to her Bridegroom.

In order to make this case, I apply what might be called an intertextual method to traditions or set of metaphors. The “text” in this intertextual study is the Hebrew Bible, but that text was heard by Jesus’ original listeners rather than read. They knew the metaphors because they heard them taught in their homes and synagogues. Jesus used these metaphors because they were current, but by combining them to describe himself, he created a new image of the eschatological age as a wedding banquet.

I first examine the eschatological “victory banquet” motif in the Hebrew Bible, starting with Isa 25:6-8 (ch. 3), the use of the Wilderness Tradition in Isaiah 40-55 (ch. 4), and the Marriage Metaphor in Hosea, Isaiah and Jeremiah (ch. 5).  I trace the development of these three themes through the Second Temple Period in chapter 6, and finally apply that database to the sayings of Jesus in chapter 7.

There are a few things that you will not find in this book. First, I did not cover John’s gospel, although there is much there that can be described as “wedding motif.” My reason for this omission are simple-the dissertation was already too long to include another major section on John’s Gospel! Second, there is nothing in this book on the application of the Bridegroom metaphor to the church. I wanted a study of Jesus’ use of the metaphor, not the (much) later theological development of that metaphor. Again, the reason for this is simply that I was writing a New Testament dissertation, doing “biblical theology” rather than “systematic theology.” I wanted to focus on the teaching of Jesus and the origin of the wedding banquet metaphor.

I would really like to hear feedback from anyone who reads the book – feel free to send me an email to continue the discussion. Thanks!

Labor Day Sale: 40% discount on Jesus the Bridegroom

Labor Day Sale

Wipf & Stock is having a Labor Day Sale. Through the weekend you can get 40% off any purchase through their website, using the discount code LABOR40. The best use of this discount is to buy my book, Jesus the Bridegroom (Pickwick, 2015).

cover-1000x1500Marianne Blickenstaff of Union Presbyterian Seminary reviewed the for Review of Biblical Literature (here is a link to the RBL Review)  I am very happy to have her review the book, especially since I read her book, ‘While the Bridegroom is with Them’: Marriage, Family, Gender and Violence in the Gospel of Matthew (London: T&T Clark, 2005) at the very beginning stages of my research on the Wedding Banquet Parable and was influenced by her reading of the Banquet Parable in Matthew 22. I appreciate her very kind review. She summarizes the book and concludes “This study is a compelling counterargument to scholarship that claims the church, and  not Jesus himself, developed the bridegroom and wedding banquet themes. Long has provided well-researched and convincing evidence that Jesus could have operated within Second Temple Jewish interpretive conventions to develop Hebrew Bible themes in new
ways to elucidate the purpose of his ministry.”

The full title of the book is Jesus the Bridegroom: The Origin of the Eschatological Feast as a Wedding Banquet in the Synoptic Gospels and is an edited version of my PhD dissertation. As I was working on my dissertation, people would ask what I was writing on. I usually said “an intertextual study on messianic banquet imagery in the Synoptic Gospels.” After a moment of awkward silence, I clarified: “Jesus said the Kingdom of Heaven is like a Wedding Banquet – what’s up with that?” I considered that as a title for a (very) short time.

The book is also available through Amazon in paperback and Kindle. The Kindle version is only $9.99 and claims to have real page numbers. There is also a Logos version of the book, if you prefer that format. If you live in the Grand Rapids area, I have a three copies in my office if you want to get one directly from me.

If you have read the book (or at least looked it over semi-seriously), please leave a review on AmazonI would appreciate your comments. Unfortunately Amazon reviews carry weight, so please consider giving the book a good rating and leaving a comment on Amazon if you can.

I would really like to hear feedback from anyone who reads the book – feel free to send me an email to continue the discussion. Thanks!