Logos Free Book of the Month for September 2019 – Craig Blomberg and Mariam Kamell, James (ZECNT)

Logos Bible Software is teaming up with Zondervan to give away a copy of Craig Blomberg and Mariam Kamell’s commentary on James in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (ZECNT) series. This “free book of the month” is an excellent addition to your library. In addition, you can add Doug Pao’s Colossians and Philemon commentary for $1.99 and Karen Jobes’s volume on 1, 2, and 3 John for $4.99. For for a mere $7 you can pick up commentaries on three different authors in the New Testament.

Craig Blomberg James CommentaryI reviewed Frank Thielman’s commentary on Romans in the ZECNT series when it was released last year. Although that commentary is not part of this promotion, I did comment on the general format of these series. Each chapter in the body of the commentary begins with the literary context of the section under examination. Following this is a snippet of the detailed outline in a faux computer window graphic and a concise main idea for the section to be studied in the chapter. The English translation of the pericope is presented in a graphical layout marked with interpretive labels for each clause. The series introduction indicates these labels are “informed by discourse analysis and narrative criticism, but the editors have also attempted to avoid technical jargon. In order to help the reader follow the flow of author’s argument, main clauses appear in bold print, subordinate clauses are indented.

Following this graphical display of the text, the commentator makes a series of observations on the structure of the pericope followed by an exegetical outline. After setting the context in several different ways, the writer moves to the commentary proper under the heading “Explanation of the Text.” Here the style of the commentary breaks up into two columns. The commentary proceeds phrase-by-phrase, with the English text in bold followed by the Greek text in parenthesis. Since key Greek words are repeated in the commentary, printing the full Greek text may not be necessary.

The final unit in each chapter is labeled “Theology in Application.” Here the commentator offers two or three points of contact with biblical theology or contemporary church issues which arise from his exegesis.

These free and almost free books are only available through the end of the month, so be sure to get them right away.

Logos Bible Software 8 is a significant upgrade to this powerful Bible study system. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. The software runs much more efficiently than the previous version, that alone is worth the upgrade. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals (currently on sale for 20%). With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library.

Flash Sale: Word Bible Commentary for Logos

Logos is offering the Word Bible Commentary for 65% off from August 30 to September 3, 2019.  In print, this full set would retail at $1200, Logos has it for $399 for five days only. You could not get the series for this price if you pick up used copies in the used section of your local book store.

The Word Bible Commentary was originally published by Word and was acquired by Thomas Nelson. In 2014 Harper Collins bought Thomas Nelson so the Word series now published by Zondervan Academic. As I have often observed, some of the older commentaries in the series are not particularly useful (for example, the Micah–Malachi covers too many books in a relatively short book, often with not much in the way of commentary!)

Since Zondervan took over the series, several revised and second editions have appeared, including Ralph Martins 2 Corinthians (reviewed here) and Trent Bulter’s two-volume Joshua commentary (my JESOT review is here). Some revised volumes were finished before Zondervan took over, including the first volume of Deuteronomy, two Psalms volumes, two Isaiah volumes, and Philippians. G. R. Beasley-Murray’s Gospel of John commentary is considered a second edition.

There are several classic commentaries in the series I would consider “must haves.” For example: Donald Hagner’s two volume Matthew commentary, John Nolland’s three volumes on Luke, Craig Evans on Mark 8:27-16:20, Andrew Lincoln on Ephesians, James Dunn on Romans (two volumes), and David Aune on Revelation (three volumes!); in the Old Testament, David Clines has three volumes on Job, J. N. D. Watts on Isaiah (two volumes) and John Goldingay on Daniel.

The format of the Word series is unique. Each section begins with a bibliography for the section (including articles in German and French). Students can “copy and paste” these into their own bibliography as they research a passage. The author then provides their own translation with notes on the text (variants and translation issues). Then the commentary has a section entitled “Form/Structure/Setting.” Some of this is a throwback to form criticism, but usually the commentator discusses the poetic and  literary features of the section and sets the section into the overall context of the book. Following the section on structure is a phrase-phrase commentary touching on key lexical and syntactical issues in the Hebrew or Greek text as well as historical and cultural features necessary for understanding the text. Following the commentary proper is a short section entitled “explanation.” Here the author offers thoughts on the theology of the section, often drawing some brief application from the text.

If you do not have the Logos software, you should at least download the free Logos Basic or the $99 Logos 8 Fundamentals (currently on sale for 20%, so $79).

With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library. Logos Bible Software 8 is a significant upgrade to this powerful Bible study system. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. The software runs much more efficiently than the previous version, that alone is worth the upgrade. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering.

Another Logos Free Book of the Month – Craig Morrison, 2 Samuel (Berit Olam)

2 Samuel Commentary by Craig MorrisonI thought it was an anomaly when Logos offered “another free book of the month,” but not in the middle of the month they are giving away a volume from a very good Old Testament commentary series, Craig Morrison’s 2 Samuel in the Berit Olam series (Liturgical Press, 1998). Morrison is professor of Aramaic and biblical exegesis at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome. In her review of the commentary for The Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Barbara Green said “Morrison’s 2 Samuel makes a wonderful addition to the Berit Olam series. He demonstrates considerable literary sensitivity in discussing a book as rich as biblical prose narrative gets. The series’ specialization in Hebrew narrative and poetry is thus well met.” Commenting on the Jobling commentary on 1 Samuel, a CBQ reviewer said:

“Written for lay people, Bible scholars, students, and religious leaders, this multi-volume commentary reflects a relatively new development in biblical studies. The readings of the books of the Hebrew Bible offered here all focus on the final form of the texts, approaching them as literary works, recognizing that the craft of poetry and storytelling that the ancient Hebrew world provided can be found in them and that their truth can be better appreciated with a fuller understanding of that art.”

For an additional $4.99, you can add David Cotter’s Genesis volume; for $6.99 add Konrad Schaefer’s Psalms commentary in the series; for $8.99 you can add David Jobling’s 2 Samuel commentary. So it will cost you about $21 to add four excellent commentaries to your Logos library.

For another two weeks you can also add Peter J. Gentry and Stephen J. Wellum, God’s Kingdom through God’s Covenants: A Concise Biblical Theology (Crossway, 2015) for free. This is a concise version of their Kingdom Through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants (Second edition; Crossway, 2018). Since the larger volume is just under a thousand pages, this concise edition does not mean small: the book is over 300 pages long. For $1.99 you can add another mammoth book from a SBTS professor on biblical theology, James Hamilton’s God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment: A Biblical Theology (Crossway. 2010). Hamilton contributed a short primer, What Is Biblical Theology? and With the Clouds of Heaven: The Book of Daniel in Biblical Theology (NSBT 32; IVP Academic, 2014). For $2.99, you can add Gerald Bray, God Is Love: A Biblical and Systematic Theology (Crossway 2012). Christopher W. Morgan of California Baptist University says  “God Is Love is a warm, conversational, and contemporary systematic theology written by one of evangelicalism’s leading thinkers. But it is much more. It is biblically saturated, historically rooted theological wisdom for the people of God.”

Logos Bible Software 8 is a significant upgrade to this powerful Bible study system. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. The software runs much more efficiently than the previous version, that alone is worth the upgrade. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals (currently on sale for 20% and you get some free books by following the link).

With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library.  These three and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of August.

Save Up to 40% on John Walton Resources for Logos

Logos has been running an Author Spotlight special the last few months. For August 2019 John Walton’s books and Mobile Ed courses are up to 40% off. This means you can add the “Lost World” series for 30% (about $10 per volume). This sale includes books Walton edited, such as the Zondervan Counterpoints book, Four Views on the Historical Adam and the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary volumes (the whole set is $139.99, or get individual volumes). These are good (although brief) commentaries focusing on cultural and historical backgrounds and are richly illustrated with full color photography. Unfortunately I do not own these in Logos so I cannot comment on how easy it is to use the illustrations in your presentations, although I have had no problems with copying out of Logos and pasting into PowerPoint.

The real highlight is Ancient Near Eastern Thought and the Old Testament: Introducing the Conceptual World of the Hebrew Bible, Second Edition (Baker 2018). Walton surveys Ancient Near Eastern literature to set the Old Testament into the proper historical context. Behind the Scenes of the Old Testament: Cultural, Social, and Historical Contexts edited John Hilber and Jonathan Greer (Baker 2018). This is a a 600+ page book with essays by a wide ranges of ANE and OT scholars. Like ANE Thought, the book is illustrated with black and white photographs and line drawings. (The first edition of Ancient Near Eastern Thought and the Old Testament is also listed, do not make the mistake of buying them both). Walton’s Old Testament Theology for Christians: From Ancient Context to Enduring Belief (IVP 2018) is also available at 30% off.

Logos has a deal on John Walton Mobile courses as well, the Background of the Old Testament Bundle (2 courses, Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine and Old Testament Genres) or get individual courses: Old Testament Genres (4 hour course); Origins of Genesis 1-3 (4 hour course); Book Study: Genesis (9 hour course). These include video lectures along with course material (syllabus, midterm and final exams). I have quite a few of these course, most have very brief, focused lectures, sometimes only a few minutes. Along with the video lecture and a transcript of the lecture, there are suggested reading in the Bible and other Logos resources (links to Bible Dictionary articles and Logos Topical Guides).

Don’t forget the Logos Free book of the Month for August 2019: Peter J. Gentry and Stephen J. Wellum, God’s Kingdom through God’s Covenants: A Concise Biblical Theology (Crossway, 2015) for free. This is a concise version of their Kingdom Through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants (Second edition; Crossway, 2018). Since the larger volume is just under a thousand pages, this concise edition does not mean small: the book is over 300 pages long. I agree with Thomas Schreiner’s assessment this book is “a third way, a via media, between covenant theology and dispensationalism” by suggesting neither theological systems is informed by biblical theology. Gentry is an Old Testament professor and Wellum is a professor of Christian theology; both teach at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky.

For $1.99 you can add another mammoth book from a SBTS professor on biblical theology, James Hamilton’s God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment: A Biblical Theology (Crossway. 2010).  For $2.99, you can add Gerald Bray, God Is Love: A Biblical and Systematic Theology (Crossway 2012). Christopher W. Morgan of California Baptist University says  “God Is Love is a warm, conversational, and contemporary systematic theology written by one of evangelicalism’s leading thinkers. But it is much more. It is biblically saturated, historically rooted theological wisdom for the people of God.”

If you do not have the Logos software, you should at least download the free Logos Basic or the $99 Logos 8 Fundamentals (currently on sale for 20%). With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library. Logos Bible Software 8 is a significant upgrade to this powerful Bible study system. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. The software runs much more efficiently than the previous version, that alone is worth the upgrade. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering.

Logos Free Book of the Month for August 2019 – God’s Kingdom through God’s Covenants: A Concise Biblical Theology

The theme of the Logos Free book of the Month for August 2019 is biblical theology. You can get Peter J. Gentry and Stephen J. Wellum, God’s Kingdom through God’s Covenants: A Concise Biblical Theology (Crossway, 2015) for free. This is a concise version of their Kingdom Through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants (Second edition; Crossway, 2018). Since the larger volume is just under a thousand pages, this concise edition does not mean small: the book is over 300 pages long. I agree with Thomas Schreiner’s assessment this book is “a third way, a via media, between covenant theology and dispensationalism” by suggesting neither theological systems is informed by biblical theology. Gentry is an Old Testament professor and Wellum is a professor of Christian theology; both teach at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky.

For $1.99 you can add another mammoth book from a SBTS professor on biblical theology, James Hamilton’s God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment: A Biblical Theology (Crossway. 2010). Hamilton contributed a short primer, What Is Biblical Theology? and With the Clouds of Heaven: The Book of Daniel in Biblical Theology (NSBT 32; IVP Academic, 2014). For $2.99, you can add Gerald Bray, God Is Love: A Biblical and Systematic Theology (Crossway 2012). Christopher W. Morgan of California Baptist University says  “God Is Love is a warm, conversational, and contemporary systematic theology written by one of evangelicalism’s leading thinkers. But it is much more. It is biblically saturated, historically rooted theological wisdom for the people of God.”

So for about $5 you can add almost two thousand pages of biblical and systematic theology to your Logos Library.

Logos Bible Software 8 is a significant upgrade to this powerful Bible study system. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. The software runs much more efficiently than the previous version, that alone is worth the upgrade. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals (currently on sale for 20%). With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library.

These three and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of August, so head to the Logos site and get them before the offer expires.

(Another) Logos Free Book of the Month – Saint Augustine: On Genesis

Faithlife publishes Logos Bible Software in a wide range of flavors and packages. Quite a while back they were putting out a free book of the month for Verbum, a version of Logos targeting Catholics. This month the have revived the Verbum free book of the month with Saint Augustine: On Genesis: Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees; and, on the Literal Interpretation of Genesis: An Unfinished Book (2001). The is book 84 in the Fathers of the Church Patristic Series from The Catholic University of America Press.

This is the first two of five explanations of the beginning of the Book of Genesis Augustine wrote between 388 and 418. The first book is a commentary on Genesis 1-3 attacking Manichees, a sub-Christian cult in which Augustine worshiped for nine years.

From the blurb:

Although Augustine agrees that many things in Scripture may seem absurd to the unlearned, he holds that they can produce great pleasures once they have been explained. It was this tenet, realized in his spiritual rather than corporeal interpretation of Scripture, that led him to counter the impious attacks the Manichees used to attract those who sought a more intellectual understanding of God over and against an anthropomorphic view. Augustine’s brilliant assimilation of Christian revelation and the intellectual faith of the Neoplatonic circle around Ambrose in Milan gave rise to his “spiritual” interpretation of Genesis 1-3 in the Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees.

The third part of this book is On the Literal Interpretation of Genesis. The book provides “fascinating and invaluable examples of Augustine’s developing thought on significant philosophical and theological issues in the interpretation of Genesis.”

In addition to the free book you can add Tractates on the Gospel of John 1–10 ($4.99) and Tractates on the Gospel of John 11–27 ($6.99). These are the first two of five volumes collecting Augustine’s 124 tractates on John in the Fathers of the Church Patristic Series. The rest are full price in the Logos Library, sadly. In his introduction to the volume, John W. Rettig explains, “The term “Tractate” (tractatus) in Latin Christian writings was a technical designation for a specific type of sermon, one which combined scriptural exegesis, preaching, spiritual commentary, and theological reflection, and which was intended to be delivered by the bishop to his congregation.” From the introduction to the series:
John the Evangelist was an eagle, soaring high in the sky into the sun; Augustine was the Lord’s trumpet, proclaiming the gospel and blaring forth its meaning. John’s Gospel is a profound theological study of Christ’s divinity; Augustine’s In Ioannis Evangelium Tractatus CXXIV are a prolonged pastoral investigation of that profundity. In them, Augustine, the world-renowned bishop of Hippo Regius, the humble pastor of souls, seeks to peer into the depths of Johannine theology and rise to the heights of Johannine illumination, that the shepherd might reveal to his sheep, as far as God granted, the meaning of John’s Gospel. For Augustine, however, preaching, and the scriptural exegesis that was a necessary part of preaching, were the truly important theological activities, more important, perhaps, than the more formal treatises.
If you do not have Logos Bible Software download the free Logos Basic or (for a limited time) get Logos 8 Fundamentals for only $49 With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library. These free and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of July, so head to the Logos site and get them before the offer expires.

Logos Free Book of the Month for July 2019 – Thomas Schreiner, Paul, Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology

The Logos Free book of the Month for July 2019 is Thomas Schreiner, Paul, Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology (IVP Academic, 2006). Tom Schreiner has published commentaries on Romans (updated 2018; BENTC). Galatians (ZECNT), and 1 Corinthians commentary in the Tyndale series. Both his New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ (Baker 2008) and The King in His Beauty: A Biblical Theology of the Old and New Testaments (Baker 2013) are well-respected. COmmenting on this 500+ page volume, Beeson Divinity School’s Frank Thielman said:

“Dr. Schreiner has produced a deeply exegetical study of Paul’s theology. Even those who disagree with some of his conclusions will benefit from his careful analysis of the text of Paul’s letters and his fair-handed treatment of alternative positions. The book will be especially useful to students and pastors, but scholars will also profit from its thoughtful exegetical discussions and its persuasive case for the centrality of God’s glory in Christ to Paul’s theology.”

For a mere $1.99 more, you can add a valuable collection of essays from the 2010 Wheaton Theology Conference evaluating the contributions of N. T. Wright, Jesus, Paul and the People of God: A Theological Dialogue with N.T.Wright. The collection was edited by Nicholas Perrin and Richard B. Hays. The book includes two presentations by Wright on the state of scholarship regarding Jesus and the state of scholarship regarding the apostle Paul. the book includes essays by Jeremy Begbie; Markus Bockmuehl; Richard B. Hays; Edith M. Humphrey; Sylvia Keesmaat and Brian Walsh; Nicholas Perrin; Marianne Meye Thompson; Kevin J. Vanhoozer Here is a review of the book from Exegetical Tools.

Logos has another “almost free” book on the same page, David deSilva’s Honor, Patronage, Kinship and Purity (IVP Academic 2000). From the blrub:

Contemporary Western readers may find it surprising that honor and shame, patronage and reciprocity, kinship and family, and purity and pollution offer us keys to interpreting the New Testament. In Honor, Patronage, Kinship and Purity, David deSilva demonstrates that paying attention to these cultural themes opens our eyes and ears to new discoveries and deeper understanding of the New Testament and its cultural context.

That is three excellent books for less than one of those frosty coffee drinks you are craving this July.

In addition to the free and almost free books, Logos is partnering with IVP Academic to give away a fourteen volume IVP New Testament Studies Collection (a $241 value, including five massive Ben Witherington books). There are several was to enter, so scroll down to the bottom of the page to join the give away.

Logos Bible Software 8 has been out since November 2018, and it is a significant upgrade. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will preserve your credit rating.

At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $99 Logos 8 Fundamentals. With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library.

These three and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of July, so head to the Logos site and get them before the offer expires.