40 Questions Series for Logos Bible Software

Logos often runs pre-publication sales on books. This helps them gauge interest and offers the user a bit of a discount.When they gather enough interest, they put the books into production and the user is charged when the resources ship. They give you a heads-up email before you are charged, and the day they are released they are added to your library.

In this case, they are offering four recent additions to Kregel’s 40 Questions series for 25% off. Click the title to read my review of three of the four volumes in this pre-pub collection.

So that $60 for just under 1500 pages of Q&A on these important topics. The price goes up when the books are released, so act soon if you want these resources for your Logos library.

Here are a few more deals from Logos Bible Software and Eerdmans books that expire at the end of May:

You need to have Logos Bible Software to use these resources.  As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals. Use the coupon code PARTNEROFFER8 to save on base packages. You can also read these books via the free iOS app. The free (or almost free) from Eerdmans end on May 31, 2020.

Memorial Day Weekend Sale at Logos Bible Software

Logos Memorial Day Sale 2020

If you are living in the US, it is Memorial Day Weekend. Logos has some great deals on resources in honor of the weekend. They are offering 25% off over 14,000 commentaries, theology resources. The sale ends end May 26 at 10:00 a.m. (PST).

Here are a few things that caught my eye:

Be sure to scroll down to the bottom and click the “Browse more resources” button to see the all the resources for sale this weekend.

Here are a few (even better) deals from Logos Bible Software on Eerdmans books that expire at the end of May:

You need to have Logos Bible Software to use these resources.  As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals. Use the coupon code PARTNEROFFER8 to save on base packages. You can also read these books via the free iOS app.

The Memorial Day Sale ends May 26 at 10AM PST, the free (or almost free) from Eerdmans end on May 31, 2020.

More Free Books from Eerdmans for Logos Bible Software for May 2020

Kugler and Hartin, Introduction to the BibleLogos Bible Software posted a few more free and nearly free books the month of May.  First, authors Robert Kugler and Patrick Hartin,  An Introduction to the Bible (Eerdmans, 2009) is free. Dale Allison said  this introduction to the Bible is “comprehensive, thoroughly informed, and lavishly illustrated volume, produced by the collaboration of two experts — one Protestant, one Catholic — achieves that to which it aspires: it is clarity itself. This is the perfect introduction for undergraduates.”

In addition to An Introduction to the Bible,  these titles from Eerdmans are available at a deep discount:

Jerome Neyrey, The Gospel of John in Cultural and Rhetorical Perspective ($2.99). Neyrey reads John through the lens of ancient rhetoric and cultural anthropology. This is the method developed in the volume of essays he edited, The Social World of Luke – Acts: Models for Interpretation (1991).

Judith Kovacs, 1 Corinthians: Interpreted by Early Christian Commentators ($5.99). The The Church’s Bible is a commentary series baed on Early Christian Medieval Commentators. Kovacs draws commentary from Augustine, Irenaeus, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Origen, John Chrysostom, and others.

Alan Fitzgerald, editor,  Augustine Through the Ages: An Encyclopedia. The hardback version of this 900+ page encyclopedia on Augustine retails for $100, but it is only $9.99 in the logos Library for this month.

As a reminder, the regular Free Book of the Month page still has Shalom Paul’s commentary on Isaiah 40–66 in the Eerdmans Critical Commentary for free.

Thomas B. Dozeman’s Exodus commentary in the same Eerdmans Critical Commentary ($5.99).

Michael Floyd’s Minor Prophets, Part 2 in the Forms of the Old Testament Literature Series for $2.99)

Antony Campbell’s volume on 1 Samuel in this series ($8.99). You can pick up the entire Forms of Old Testament Literature series for Logos as well.

You need to have Logos Bible Software to use these resources.  As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals. Use the coupon code PARTNEROFFER8 to save 30% on base packages. You can also read these books via the free iOS app.

These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through May 31, 2020.

Logos Free Book of the Month for May 2020 – Eerdmans Critical Commentary on Isaiah 40-66

Shalom Paul Isaiah commentaryThe Logos Free Book of the Month promotion offers a heavyweight commentary from Eerdmans. For the month of May, you can add Shalom Paul’s commentary on Isaiah 40–66 in the Eerdmans Critical Commentary. Paul is the Yehezkel Kaufman Professor Emeritus of Bible at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and chair of the Dead Sea Scrolls Foundation.  The commentary won the Biblical Archaeology Society Publication Award for Best Book Relating to the Hebrew Bible in 2013.

Shalom Paul’s comprehensive, all-inclusive study of the oracles of an anonymous prophet known only as Second Isaiah who prophesied in the second half of the sixth century B.C.E. Paul examines Isaiah 40–66 through a close reading of the biblical text, offering thorough exegesis of the historical, linguistic, literary, and theological aspects of the prophet’s writings. He also looks carefully at intertextual influences of earlier biblical and extrabiblical books, draws on the contributions of medieval Jewish commentators, and supports the contention that Second Isaiah should include chapters 55–66, thus eliminating the need to demarcate a Third Isaiah.

Check out this excerpt from the book on EerdWorld.

In addition to this Isaiah 40-66 commentary, you can add Thomas B. Dozeman’s Exodus commentary in the same Eerdmans Critical Commentary for an additional $5.99.  A review in the Journal of Theological Studies said “The sheer amount of information given in the commentary is amazing, and any reader who already has some competence in the subject will feel indebted to Dozeman for spreading such a varied buffet to select from.” This commentary is nearly 900 pages on Exodus, presenting “a fresh translation of the Hebrew text of Exodus along with a careful interpretation of its central themes, literary structure, and history of composition. He explores two related themes in the formation of the book of Exodus: the identity of Yahweh, the God of Israel, and the authority of Moses, the leader of the Israelite people.”

Floyd Minor ProphetsFor $2.99, you can add Michael Floyd’s Minor Prophets, Part 2 in the Forms of the Old Testament Literature Series. If you scroll all the way down the page, Logos has Antony Campbell’s volume on 1 Samuel in this series for $8.99. The FOTL series “presents a form-critical analysis of the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) based on a standard outline and methodology” including structure, genre, setting, and intention of the biblical literature in question. Religious Studies Review considered Floyd’s volume “one of the finest volumes in the FOTL series and is a must buy for anyone doing serious form-critical work in the books Nahum through Malachi.”

You can pick up the entire Forms of Old Testament Literature series for Logos as well.

So for about $18 you can get three major scholar works on the Old Testament, with a retail price of nearly $200.

The Logos giveaway for the month of May is excellent: enter to win a full set of Theological Dictionary of the Old Testament and New Testament, 26 volumes with a retail value of $799! The TDNT is dated, but is still a standard resource for New Testament studies. The TDOT is the best theological lexicon on for Hebrew available, the final volumes were only published 2019. Enter early and enter often to win this major academic resource.

You need to have Logos Bible Software to use these resources.  As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals. Use the coupon code PARTNEROFFER8 to save 30% on base packages. You can also read these books via the free iOS app.

These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through May 31, 2020.

More Free Books for Logos Bible Software – Joseph Blenkinsopp

In addition to the regular Free Book promotion from Logos (this month it is a one-hour Mobile Course on Faith Working Through Love by N. T. Wright), Logos has added a second promotion featuring Joseph Blenkinsopp. He is Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana and has written major commentaries on Isaiah 1-39, 4-55, and 56-66 in the Anchor Bible Commentary, Ezra-Nehemiah in the OTL (as well as Judaism, the First Phase: The Place of Ezra and Nehemiah in the Origins of Judaism, Eerdmans 2009), and Opening the Sealed Book: Interpretations of the Book of Isaiah in Late Antiquity (Eerdmans, 2006). His History of Prophecy in Israel (WJKP 1996) is a classic textbook. He has published shorter books on Abraham: The Story of a Life (Eerdmans 2015) and David Remembered: Kingship and National Identity in Ancient Israel (Eerdmans 2013).

For the next month, you can add Blenkinsopp’s Creation, Un-creation, Re-creation: A Discursive Commentary on Genesis 1-11 (T&T Clark 2011) to your Logos Library for free. This is a commentary on Genesis 1-11 arguing “from biblical point of view, creation cannot be restricted to a single event, nor to two versions of an event (as depicted in Genesis 1-3) but, rather, must take in the whole period of creation arranged in the sequence: creation – uncreation – recreation (as can be derived from Genesis 1-11).”

For $2.99 add Blenkinsopp’s Interpretation commentary on Ezekiel (WJKP, 2012). Although not everyone appreciates the Interpretation series, the brevity of the commentary make for a quite read (and the price is right!)

For an additional $4.99 add his Wisdom and Law in the Old Testament: The Ordering of Life in Israel and Early Judaism (Oxford University Press, 1995). This might be the real gem of Logos’s promotion since the book is difficult to find inexpensively in print.

Scroll all the way to the bottom and add his Ezra-Nehemiah commentary for $6.99

So for the next thirty days, you can pick up three excellent, scholarly resources for your Logos library for less than $15.

If you are looking for a good way to spent your stimulus check and do not have Logos Bible Software yet, download the free Logos Basic or Logos 8 Fundamentals for only $99. With either minimal package you can download and use these sale books as well as the Logos free book every month.

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for April 2020 – N. T. Wright, Faith Working Through Love

Faith Working Through Love by N.T. Wright (1 hour course)Rather than a free book for the Logos Bible Software, this month Faithlife is giving away a one-hour Mobile Course on Faith Working Through Love by N. T. Wright.

If you have not experienced a Faithlife course, this is a good chance to see what a Faithlife Mobile Learning course looks like. When you download the course, you will get a document with a syllabus, course outcomes and course outline.

For an hour course, you will get about an hour of video lecture (for the nine-hour course, you get about nine hours of lecture). The videos for this course are broken into nine sections, each main session is about ten minutes (as short as 7 minutes, as long as 13 minutes). Wright has a short intro to the show course and four of the videos are simply Wright reading the key Scripture for the session.

There are a few questions and a quiz for each session.The questions are entitled “process ideas and probing questions” (essay questions, reflection questions) and can be answered right in the mobile course in Logos. The self-quizzes are brief, all true/false or multiple-choice.

The outline for the free course is:

  1. Session One: The Transformative Power of the Gospel for Faithful Living
  2. Session Two: Modeling Faithfulness in the World (Philippians)
  3. Session Three: The Transformative Power of Worship for Faithful Living (Romans 12)
  4. Session Four: Modeling Faithfulness in the Church (2 Thessalonians 3:6–13)

Here is the Faithlife blurb for the free course:

Discover how Biblical wisdom can help you find meaning in your work. We are all engaged in some kind of work, whether it comes with a paycheck or not. Regardless of the kind of work you do, from bussing tables, to taking care of your home and family, to managing a business, chances are you want to find meaning in your endeavors. In this intriguing course, Professor N.T. Wright examines a series of Biblical texts that discuss how Christians should consider the work they do. As you’re guided through Old and New Testament teachings, you’ll discover concrete actions you can take to live out the fullness of being in the image of God, and become an agent for positive change in a broken society.

In addition to the free course, Faithlife is offering Wright’s hour lecture on The Lord’s Prayer for $9.99 (50% off), Paul and His Letter to the Philippians for $19.99 (83% off, 4.5 hours) and The Acts of the Apostles for $34.99 (88% off, 9 hour course).

The monthly giveaway is N. T. Wright themed as well. There are several ways to enter to win The N. T. Wright Collection (51 vols., a $689.99 value).

These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through April 30, 2020.

Logos Free Book of the Month for March 2020 – Lexham Research Commentary: Genesis 1-11

For the month of March Logos is giving away the Lexham Research Commentary on Genesis 1-11 (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012). What is a “research commentary”? This resource is edited by Miles Custis, Douglas Mangum, and Wendy Widder as a way of bringing all the resources of the Logos Library into a commentary-like format. The guides are a research tool presenting a wide range of interpretive issues raised by Bible scholars. The idea of these Research Commentaries is similar To Allan Ross’s Creation and Blessing, a commentary on Genesis which often pointed out what a pastor or teacher needs to sort out before actually teaching the text.

The editors of the series explain in the preface to the Genesis 1-11 volume:

Each volume in the series links to standard scholarly works on the Bible. The authors of the Lexham Research Commentaries have made no attempt to identify where particular interpretations fall along the theological or denominational spectrum. This is a mark of the diversity of biblical interpretation, not a mark of implicit endorsement by the guides’ authors. Interpreters from different theological perspectives often have conflicting views on the same texts. As you encounter these views, we urge you to keep the biblical text itself central to your study.

How does this differ from running the Logos Bible Study or Word Study tools? The topics and resources are curated and annotated by the editors of the volume. After an introduction to the section of Genesis, the editors select a series of issues every interpret must struggle with and come to some conclusion in their teaching. For Genesis 1, the issues include

  • The Genre of Genesis 1
  • Worldview of Genesis
  • Days of Creation
  • Culture Wars over Creation
  • Creation from Nothing
  • The Image of God
  • The Sabbath
  • Key Word Study: Bereshith, “In the Beginning”
  • Key Word Study: Tohu wabohu, “Formless and Void”
  • Background Studies: Ancient Near Eastern Creation Stories

Just one or two examples: For the Image of God, after a short paragraph describing what the problem is and offering several options, there are links to the article “Image of God” in the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch, a link to Claus Westermann, Continental Commentary Series commentary Genesis 1–11, specifically his “Excursus: The History of the Exegesis of Genesis 1:26–27.” and Gordon Wenham’s discussion of “‘Image’ and ‘Likeness’ ” in his Word Biblical Commentary on Genesis 1–15. On the word Bereshith, there are links to Kenneth Mathews, Excursus on translating 1:1–2 in his New American Commentary on Genesis 1–11:26, Victor Hamilton;s New International Commentary on the Old Testament on Genesis 1–17, and Wenham’s Word commentary. These linked resources are often Bible Dictionaries or theological lexicons.

For more controversial topics, such as the Days of Creation, the editors offer more annotations. Here are the six resources suggested by the Lexham Research Commentary:

  • Robert Gurney offers a defense of the young earth creationist interpretation, taking the days of creation as six literal 24-hour days. “Does It Matter?” Six Day Creation: Does It Matter What You Believe?
  • Victor Hamilton’s commentary carefully explains the three major interpretive options: the literal 24-hour day, the day-age theory, and the literary framework theory. Hamilton’s preference is a literary reading of Gen 1 with an analogical understanding of the days of creation. “The ‘Days’ of Genesis 1” The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: The Book of Genesis, Chapters 1–17
  • R. Kent Hughes lists six different possible interpretations of the days of creation. He admits only one can be correct but cautions against letting the issue become a point of division among believers. He argues for the analogical view—that the days are God’s workdays, which are analogous with earth days but not necessarily the same as literal 24-hour days. “Genesis 1:3–13” Preaching the Word: Genesis—Beginning and Blessing
  • John Lennox has an old earth creationist perspective but discusses the options for understanding the days of creation as literal 24-hour days, as undefined lengths of time (day-age), or as a literary framework. His conclusion is a form of the punctuated activity view, in which long spans of time separate the literal 24-hour days of creation. “But Is It Old? The Days of Creation” Seven Days that Divide the World: The Beginning according to Genesis and Science
  • Hugh Ross believes in an old earth and that “days” represent ages or epochs of time. He explains how this view is not incompatible with Genesis. “Introduction: The Dawn of a New Day” A Matter of Days: Resolving a Creation Controversy
  • John Walton accepts that the days of creation could be 24-hour days, but he argues that God is creating functions not matter during the week of creation. By the end of the week, He takes up residence in His cosmic temple. “Gen 1:1–31” The NIV Application Commentary: Genesis

Each unit is introduced with a comment on the structure (an outline), the place of the section in the book of Genesis and the place in the canon, and a very helpful “starting point.” This last item is a way to introduce the key issues for understanding the section.

All of the links in this resource are marked with either an open book or a padlock. Open books mean you have purchased the linked resource, locks mean you have not. This is my main criticism of the Lexham Research Commentaries: they are essentially guides to helping you spend more money in the Logos store. If you only have a few resources in your library, then the links will all be locked. People with larger libraries will find these resources more useful. I also wonder if the editors were limited in their resource annotations to only resources licensed through the Logos library? Are there are other articles, books and commentaries which would have been very helpful for the issue at hand which were omitted simply because Logos does not sell it?

Nevertheless, the commentary is provided in the Genesis 1-15 volume is in fact a good introduction to controversial topics and interpretive conundrums and the resources provided are available in any Christian University or Seminary library.

You can add the Jonah commentary for $4,99 and the First Peter commentary for another $9.99. As is often the case, Logos is running a giveaway with several ways to enter to win all 20 volumes of the Lexham Research Commentaries.

These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through March 31, 2020.