50% off Commentary Sale at Logos

Logos is running a great sale on their top rated commentaries. This includes both the Old Testament series and the New Testament series. Most of these are 50% off retail, I noticed a few a bit more than that. The page is arranged by book of the Bible with some easy navigation at the top. Logos selected their top five (by ratings? by sales?). There are volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary, Anchor Bible Commentary, The New International Old Testament and New Testament Commentary (NICOT and NICNT), a few in the New International Greek Text Commentary series, some International Critical Commentary volumes, a few Pillar New Testament, Tyndale Old and New Testament Commentaries, and a few NIV Application commentaries.

As they used to say on TV, “and many many more.”

Back in 2012 I did a “Top Five Commentaries” series; many of my topic picks are for sale from Logos, so check out what I said seven years ago: Matthew  Mark  Luke   John   Acts    Romans  1 Corinthians   2 Corinthians  Galatians  Ephesians  Philippians  Colossians  1-2 Thessalonians   Pastoral Epistles   Philemon    Hebrews   James   1 Peter   2 Peter & Jude     Letters of John   Revelation

For more recent volumes, have reviewed several of NICNT commentaries, so click through to the full reviews on these volumes.

If you do not have Logos Bible Software download the free Logos Basic or (for a limited time) get Logos 8 Fundamentals for only $49 With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library.

I do not see an expiration date for this sale, but I cannot imagine it will last long. Head to the Sale page and load up on excellent professional commentaries for your Logos library.

 

(Another) Logos Free Book of the Month – Saint Augustine: On Genesis

Faithlife publishes Logos Bible Software in a wide range of flavors and packages. Quite a while back they were putting out a free book of the month for Verbum, a version of Logos targeting Catholics. This month the have revived the Verbum free book of the month with Saint Augustine: On Genesis: Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees; and, on the Literal Interpretation of Genesis: An Unfinished Book (2001). The is book 84 in the Fathers of the Church Patristic Series from The Catholic University of America Press.

This is the first two of five explanations of the beginning of the Book of Genesis Augustine wrote between 388 and 418. The first book is a commentary on Genesis 1-3 attacking Manichees, a sub-Christian cult in which Augustine worshiped for nine years.

From the blurb:

Although Augustine agrees that many things in Scripture may seem absurd to the unlearned, he holds that they can produce great pleasures once they have been explained. It was this tenet, realized in his spiritual rather than corporeal interpretation of Scripture, that led him to counter the impious attacks the Manichees used to attract those who sought a more intellectual understanding of God over and against an anthropomorphic view. Augustine’s brilliant assimilation of Christian revelation and the intellectual faith of the Neoplatonic circle around Ambrose in Milan gave rise to his “spiritual” interpretation of Genesis 1-3 in the Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees.

The third part of this book is On the Literal Interpretation of Genesis. The book provides “fascinating and invaluable examples of Augustine’s developing thought on significant philosophical and theological issues in the interpretation of Genesis.”

In addition to the free book you can add Tractates on the Gospel of John 1–10 ($4.99) and Tractates on the Gospel of John 11–27 ($6.99). These are the first two of five volumes collecting Augustine’s 124 tractates on John in the Fathers of the Church Patristic Series. The rest are full price in the Logos Library, sadly. In his introduction to the volume, John W. Rettig explains, “The term “Tractate” (tractatus) in Latin Christian writings was a technical designation for a specific type of sermon, one which combined scriptural exegesis, preaching, spiritual commentary, and theological reflection, and which was intended to be delivered by the bishop to his congregation.” From the introduction to the series:
John the Evangelist was an eagle, soaring high in the sky into the sun; Augustine was the Lord’s trumpet, proclaiming the gospel and blaring forth its meaning. John’s Gospel is a profound theological study of Christ’s divinity; Augustine’s In Ioannis Evangelium Tractatus CXXIV are a prolonged pastoral investigation of that profundity. In them, Augustine, the world-renowned bishop of Hippo Regius, the humble pastor of souls, seeks to peer into the depths of Johannine theology and rise to the heights of Johannine illumination, that the shepherd might reveal to his sheep, as far as God granted, the meaning of John’s Gospel. For Augustine, however, preaching, and the scriptural exegesis that was a necessary part of preaching, were the truly important theological activities, more important, perhaps, than the more formal treatises.
If you do not have Logos Bible Software download the free Logos Basic or (for a limited time) get Logos 8 Fundamentals for only $49 With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library. These free and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of July, so head to the Logos site and get them before the offer expires.

Logos Free Book of the Month for July 2019 – Thomas Schreiner, Paul, Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology

The Logos Free book of the Month for July 2019 is Thomas Schreiner, Paul, Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology (IVP Academic, 2006). Tom Schreiner has published commentaries on Romans (updated 2018; BENTC). Galatians (ZECNT), and 1 Corinthians commentary in the Tyndale series. Both his New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ (Baker 2008) and The King in His Beauty: A Biblical Theology of the Old and New Testaments (Baker 2013) are well-respected. COmmenting on this 500+ page volume, Beeson Divinity School’s Frank Thielman said:

“Dr. Schreiner has produced a deeply exegetical study of Paul’s theology. Even those who disagree with some of his conclusions will benefit from his careful analysis of the text of Paul’s letters and his fair-handed treatment of alternative positions. The book will be especially useful to students and pastors, but scholars will also profit from its thoughtful exegetical discussions and its persuasive case for the centrality of God’s glory in Christ to Paul’s theology.”

For a mere $1.99 more, you can add a valuable collection of essays from the 2010 Wheaton Theology Conference evaluating the contributions of N. T. Wright, Jesus, Paul and the People of God: A Theological Dialogue with N.T.Wright. The collection was edited by Nicholas Perrin and Richard B. Hays. The book includes two presentations by Wright on the state of scholarship regarding Jesus and the state of scholarship regarding the apostle Paul. the book includes essays by Jeremy Begbie; Markus Bockmuehl; Richard B. Hays; Edith M. Humphrey; Sylvia Keesmaat and Brian Walsh; Nicholas Perrin; Marianne Meye Thompson; Kevin J. Vanhoozer Here is a review of the book from Exegetical Tools.

Logos has another “almost free” book on the same page, David deSilva’s Honor, Patronage, Kinship and Purity (IVP Academic 2000). From the blrub:

Contemporary Western readers may find it surprising that honor and shame, patronage and reciprocity, kinship and family, and purity and pollution offer us keys to interpreting the New Testament. In Honor, Patronage, Kinship and Purity, David deSilva demonstrates that paying attention to these cultural themes opens our eyes and ears to new discoveries and deeper understanding of the New Testament and its cultural context.

That is three excellent books for less than one of those frosty coffee drinks you are craving this July.

In addition to the free and almost free books, Logos is partnering with IVP Academic to give away a fourteen volume IVP New Testament Studies Collection (a $241 value, including five massive Ben Witherington books). There are several was to enter, so scroll down to the bottom of the page to join the give away.

Logos Bible Software 8 has been out since November 2018, and it is a significant upgrade. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will preserve your credit rating.

At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $99 Logos 8 Fundamentals. With either minimal package you can download and use the free book every month and build your Logos library.

These three and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of July, so head to the Logos site and get them before the offer expires.

Logos Flash Sale on New Studies in Biblical Theology

New Studies in Biblical Theology (45 vols.)

June 21–23 only, enjoy great savings on D. A. Carson’s New Studies in Biblical Theology from IVP Academic.  Individual volumes are $9.99, or get the whole set for $399. Back in February Logos gave away Mark Seifrid’s Christ, Our Righteousness: Paul’s Theology of Justification (2000) and offered great discounts on Peter G. Bolt, The Cross from a Distance: Atonement in Mark’s Gospel (2004) and Craig Blomberg’s Contagious Holiness:Jesus’ Meals with Sinners (2005). If you did buy those three in February, the cost of the whole set will be lower; Logos will not charge you for books you already own.

If you are unfamiliar with this series, the original Studies in Biblical Theology was published by SCM Press from 1952 through 1973. It included several important volumes, such as Early Christian Worship by Oscar Cullmann, Christ in the Wilderness by Ulrich W. Mauser and The Rediscovery of Apocalyptic by Klaus Koch. In 1995 IVP Academic re-booted the series with D. A. Carson as the series editor. Here is a summary of the first 35 volumes at the Gospel Coalition.

I have reviewed a few titles in the series (I have several more in my reading pile).

The sale does not include Peter T. O’Brien’s God Has Spoken in His Son: A Biblical Theology of Hebrews (2016; it was withdrawn from the series) or the recently published All Things New: Revelation as Canonical Capstone by Brian J. Tabb.

Logos Bible Software also released a major upgrade at the end of 2018.  I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version (everything runs faster than Logos 7). You can save 25% on any upgrades to Logos 8 and pick five free books when you upgrade to Logos 8. Follow the link and used the code READINGACTS8.

Look over the titles on the Logos sale page, I am sure you will find many interesting studies to add to your Logos collection. But do not wait too long, the sale is over midnight PDT, June 23, 2019.

“Everything N. T. Wright” Sale at Logos

During the last week of May. Logos is running a sale on N. T. Wright. Since Wright is so prolific, you might be wondering where to start. His Simply Christian or Surprised by Hope ($16.09 each) are basic presentations of Christian theology in the tradition of C. S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity. I have used The Challenge of Jesus ($11.89) for many years as supplemental reading in my Jesus and the Gospels class.

His Tyndale Commentary on Colossians and Philemon on the list ($11.19). This is one of the most readable commentaries I have read; academic yet spiritually challenging. It is far more detailed than his For Everyone commentary series ($10.49 a volume). Wright comments briefly on every book of the New Testament. Not academic, but very well suited for a small group Bible Study or a supplement to one’ s personal Bible reading. Pick out individual volumes or get the twenty volume bundle.

One of Wright’s first works is available, the essays in Climax of the Covenant ($13.99) introduces some of the themes which he develops in his later more extensive works. HIs Justification: God’s Plan and Paul’s Vision is only $11.19. This was the book written in conversation with John Piper and sets out his view of justification.

If you are up to the challenge, the four volumes of the Christian Origins and the Question of God are excellent. The Resurrection of the Son of God is perhaps the most detailed survey of the idea of resurrection in the Second Temple period available; Paul and the Faithfulness of God is a massive 1500+ theology of Paul, and generated a large volume of appreciative responses God and the Faithfulness of Paul edited by Michael Bird and Christoph Helig and J. Thomas Hewitt (Fortress Press 2017).

  • The New Testament and the People of God
  • Jesus and the Victory of God
  • The Resurrection of the Son of God
  • Paul and the Faithfulness of God

Logos sells a bundle of all four volumes in the series ($104.99). The last of these is part of a Pauline trilogy, Wright’s Pauline Theology itself, a survey of Pauline studies and a collection of Wright’s essays on Paul gathered from various journals and edited volumes:

  • Paul and the Faithfulness of God
  • Paul and His Recent Interpreters
  • Pauline Perspectives: Essays on Paul 1978–2013

If all that is intimidating, start with his Paul: Fresh Perspectives. For many years before Paul and the Faithfulness of God was published this was Wright’s brief overview of Pauline theology; I have used it many times ans supplemental reading in a Pauline Lit class. Missing from the sale is his first book on Paul, the provocatively titled What Saint Paul Really Said: Was Paul of Tarsus the Real Founder of Christianity? (Eerdmans 1997), but the book is not available in the Logos Library.

Two volumes in this sale are not by N. T. Wright, but the feature his ideas. Exile: A Conversation with N.T. Wright is a collection of essays on Wright’s claim Second Temple period Jews thought of themselves as still living in the Exile. The real steal on this sale is Galatians and Christian Theology: Justification, the Gospel, and Ethics in Paul’s Letter (Baker Academic 2014) includes essays on justification, gospel and ethics in Galatians by Mark W. Elliott, John Barclay, Beverly Gaventa, Richard Hays, Bruce McCormack, Oliver O’Donovan, and many others. Wright’s article is “Messiahship in Galatians?”

There are many more books on the sale, these are only the highlights (or, things which interest me). You could get everything by Wright for your Logos library fr $482.99 (go big or go home). But the sale only runs through May 31, 2019, so visit the Logos N. T. Wright sale and load up on summer reading.

Logos recently released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. Logos base packages are 20% off through May 31. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will preserve your credit rating. Use the code READINGACTS8 to save 20%.

The Logos Free book of the Month for May 2019 is I. Howard Marshall, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles (T&T Clark, Hb. 1999, Pb. 2013). Be sure to get this book (along with the almost free C. K. Barrett volumes on Acts). See my comments on this excellent free resource here.

 

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for May 2019 – I. Howard Marshall, ICC Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles

The Logos Free book of the Month for May 2019 is I. Howard Marshall, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles (T&T Clark, Hb. 1999, Pb. 2013). This is a tremendous gift from Logos since Marshall’s commentary is a major contribution to scholarship on the Pastoral Epistles.The print version of this commentary in the cheaper paperback format is available on Amazon for $65, good luck finding hardback copies (list price $155)! In addition to the price, the major advantage of owning the book in the Logos library is all the Logos tools are available to reader. This goes far beyond simple searching and highlighting.

At over 900 pages, this commentary is one of the most comprehensive exegetical commentaries available. Marshall wrote the commentary in collaboration with Philip Towner, the author of the NICNT commentary on the Pastoral Epistles (Eerdmans 2006) as well as the short commentary in the IVP New Testament Commentary series.

I listed Marshall’s commentary in my “Top Five Commentaries on the Pastoral epistles” a few years ago. I said:

Marshall’s contribution is perhaps the most detailed exegetical commentary on the list, as is to be expected from an ICC volume. Marshall replaced Walter Lock’s 1924 commentary in the series. The book caused a stir when it was released since Marshall (beloved by many evangelicals) rejected Pauline authorship of these letters. The introduction to the commentary develops Marshall’s view of authorship. The body of the commentary contains detailed bibliographies for each section followed by an overview of the text. The format of the commentary is a phrase-by-phrase unpacking of the Greek text, including textual, lexical and syntactical issues. He interacts with a broad range of scholarship, with Marshall includes a number of excellent excurses (on Household Codes, in Titus, for example).

The International Critical Commentary has been one of the top critical commentaries for well over 100 years. Each commentary in the series comments on the Hebrew or Greek text, dealing with textual, syntactical, and lexicial issues. As with most commentary series, this commentary by Marshall replaced the 1924 volume by Walter Lock. Lock’s commentary had 46 pages of introduction and 159 pages dealing with exegetical issues for all three Pastoral Epistles. It is still available through Logos (and is often found used for $10 or so).

In addition to Marshall’s commentary, Logos is offering both volumes of C. K. Barrett’s Acts commentary in the ICC series for $1.99 and $2.99 each. Barrett is always worth reading and this Acts commentary is no exception. The two volumes were published in 1994 and 1998 and offer solid exegetical comments are remarkably readable. With respect to historicity, Barrett said “Where he agrees with other historical sources, his evidence is confirmed; where he disagrees, or where other evidence is lacking, he must at least be taken seriously (2:cxiv).

Logos usually does a related giveaway on their Free Book promo page. This month you can enter to win the The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew edited by David J.A. Clines (8 vols.; Sheffield,1993–2011; $299 value). This is an exceptional lexicon for serious students of the Hebrew Bible. In many ways the lexicon is like HALOT (Brill, 1994-2000) but is far more comprehensive and includes references to the Qumran literature. Enter early and often, Logos will give the Lexicon away to some lucky winner at the end of the month.

Logos recently released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. Logos base packages are 20% off through May 31. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will preserve your credit rating.

These three and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of May, so head to the Logos site and get them before the offer expires.

Logos Free Book of the Month for April 2019 – Charles Quarles, A Theology of Matthew

The Logos Free book of the Month for April 2019 is Charles Quarles, A Theology of Matthew: Jesus Revealed as Deliverer, King, and Incarnate Creator (P&R, 2013).

This book is part of the Explorations in Biblical Theology from P & R Publishing. Doug Moo said “Using key Old Testament figures and themes as his framework, Charles Quarles summarizes very nicely Matthew’s main theological ideas. The book is marked by an admirable combination of biblical exposition and practical application.” As the title implies, Quarles highlights Jesus the fulfillment of the Old Testament. One-time biblio-blogger Jennifer Guo described this series as “offering believers substantial biblical and theological content at a popular-level of readability and accessibility.”

Logos usually adds two more books from the same publisher for “almost free.” In addition to the Quarles book, you can add two volumes of the The Gospel According to the Old Testament series from P&R. For $1.99 you can add Tremper Longman’s Immanuel in Our Place: Seeing Christ in Israel’s Worship (P&R 2001) and for $2.99 Mark Boda’s After God’s Own Heart: The Gospel According to David (P&R, 2007). Philip Ryken says “As Mark Boda shows in this useful and accessible book, the house of David is central to the Bible’s message of salvation.” Commenting on Longman, Bruce Waltke heartily recommends the book saying “Christians struggle in understanding the relevance of large parts of the Old Testament, particularly concerning the worship of ancient Israel. In this beautifully conceived work, Longman has illuminated the priestly material in a way that makes it theologically relevant for today.”

The bottom line is that you can add three excellent books to your Logos Library for about $5. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to enter the Logos giveaway for the month, a four-volume A Theology of Lordship collection from P&R.

If you are interested in reformed theology, Logos has several collections from P&R Publishing on sale in April, including a twelve volume collection of John Frame books and the twenty-seven volume Reformed Expository Commentary (many volumes written by Philip Graham Ryken).

Logos recently released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will preserve your credit rating.