Cyber Monday 2020 at Logos Bible Software

Logos Cyber Monday

I will admit: Cyber Monday is just a made up thing for online retailers to pry a few more dollars out of your wallet. Most of the time I really do not care much for the deals. However, this year’s Logos Cyber Monday promotion has some really good deals, worthy of #ShutUpAndTakeMyMoney meme.

Here is the best deal I have seen from Logos in a long time: Library of New Testament Studies (LNTS/JSNTS) (85 vols.) 90% off, $125.99 sale price. You can have a professional library’s worth of high-end academic monographs for about $1.50 a volume. Many of these volumes were originally $125 in hardback, even in the cheaper paperback they are usually around $40 each.

Although not quite as eye-popping as the LNTS sale, the Eerdmans Modern Biblical Scholarship Bundle is a great deal on 100 volumes from Eerdmans, almost ever one is an excellent commentary or monograph on the Old or New Testament. It might be pricey, but at 70% off retail you might consider it an investment. Logos also will not charge you for volumes you already own, so click through to see the “dynamic pricing.” It might be worth topping off your Eerdmans commentary collection.

Logos is also offering the 16-volume set of Theological Dictionary of the Old Testament for 78% off, only $149.99. TDOT is one of the best Hebrew Language tools you can use,

For the more theologically inclined, Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics (31 vols.) 70% off, $89.99 sale price. I also see the 188-volume Ultimate Puritan Collection on sale for $99, folks like John Owen, Richard Baxter, John Bunyan, Thomas Boston, etc. Once again, you might already own some of these resources so the actual price maybe be significantly lower. A related massive collection is the Reformed Commentary Bundle, 198 commentaries from historic writers like John Calvin, Matthew Poole, John Owen, Matthew Henry, but also top Reformed thinkers fin  the Pillar New Testament Commentary, New International Greek Testament Commentary, Mentor Commentary, etc. The bundle is only $249, about 65% off. You should strategize your purchases, but one sent then go back later to buy the second set so you get the dynamic pricing. I do not think they will charge you twice if there is overlap between the sets, but better safe than sorry.

You can also fill in a few volumes from popular commentary series:

There are dozens more books on sale with deep discounts and a few great deals on  Logos’s mobile courses (like Exegetical Study: Paul’s Letter to the Philippians  for $35). But you need to act fast since the Cyber Monday event expires at midnight (PST) November 30, 2020.

Shut Up and Take My Money

Black Friday 2020 at Logos Bible Software

Logos Black Friday

Logos is doing their annual “Black Friday Weekend” sale, and there are some great deals this year. You can save on new Logos 9 base packages and Logos 8 Legacy packages. Legacy packages are “without features and datasets, making it the perfect standalone collection of resources to help grow your library.” You can choose your the level that fits your budget best, the started Legacy package is only $30,but of course you can get Silver, Gold, Platinum, Diamond, probably gold-pressed Latinum, Solari and Melange levels.

I see quite a few things on the sale page worthy of my dollars..maybe too many books! Here are a few highlights from the sale:

  • The Romans Collection (125 vols.) 80% off, $199.99 sale price
  • Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible | BTC (24 vols.) 50% off, $299.99 sale price
  • Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 46 | WBC $19.99 per volume
  • Gordon D. Fee New Testament Studies Collection (8 vols.) 70% off, $59.99 sale price
  • Wipf & Stock D.A. Carson Collection (5 vols.) 66% off, $29.99 sale price
  • The IVP New Testament Commentary Series (20 vols.) 85% off, $42.99 sale price
  • Crossway Top Authors Bundle (94 vols.) 75% off, $219.99 sale price
  • Opening Up Commentary Series (47 vols.) 66% off, $99.99 sale price
  • John Goldingay and N. T. Wright’s The Bible for Everyone Commentaries are only $2.99 per volume
  • Black’s New Testament Commentaries are only $9.99 per volume (get Dunn’s Galatians!)
  • Volumes of the Socio-Rhetorical Commentaries (Witherington, etc) are 50% – 66% off, $9.99-$19.99
  • Zondervan Counterpoint Volumes are only $9.99 each
  • All Lexham Press titles are 40% off.

These on-sale resources will work on earlier versions, but if you are using any version prior to Logos 8, then you should consider an upgrade. The new version is much faster than Logos 7 and the upgrades are worth the money. If you are happy with Logos 8, you might consider a minimal upgrade in order to take advantage of the updated datasets. 

There are many more excellent deals to be had before midnight (PST) November 29, 2020.

Black Friday Deals for Logos Bible Software

It is that time of the year again, when businesses try to pry open your wallet by calling it a “Black Friday Sale.” To be honest, I am not tempted at all to wade into the chaos that is a Black Friday sale at Walmart to get a new TV or cheap laptop. But a Black Friday sale on books, now you have my interest. When Logos Bible Software says “Commentaries for $7.99,” now you have my attention! Here are a few commentaries whic caught my eye (and ended up in my shopping cart):

  • Walter Brueggemann, Genesis in the Interpretation series
  • James, Dunn, The Acts of the Apostles (Eerdmans, my review here)
  • G. K. Beale, Revelation: A Shorter Commentary (Eerdmans, my review here)
  • Craig Keener, The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament, 2nd ed.

Various volumes of the following series are available as well:

  • The Two Horizons Old Testament Commentary
  • Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching
  • Understanding the Bible Commentary
  • Preach the Text
  • Old Testament Library (WJKP)
  • New Covenant Commentary (Cascade)
  • College Press NIV Commentary
  • Reformed Expository Commentary

There are many more than this on the sale page, so check them out. This $7.99 commentary sale expires Monday, November 23. Logos plans on a fourth week of deals, so maybe it is time to open a new credit card. DOn’t even think about what Dave Ramsey would say.

Don’t forget Logos just released a new version of their software. These on-sale resources will work on earlier versions, but i9f you are using any version prior to Logos 8, then you should consider an upgrade. The new version is much faster than Logos 7 and the upgrades are worth the money. If you are happy with Logos 8, you might consider a minimal upgrade in order to take advantage of the updated datasets. Since this is a new release, Logos is offering upgrade discounts, click the links and pick an upgrade path that fits your budget. If you are a first time Logos customer, there are some free books and other perks for you.

 

More Free Books for Logos Bible Software in November 2020

Levering Brazos Ezra NehemiahLogos just added another free book for November, Matthew Levering’s Brazos Commentary on Ezra and Nehemiah. This series is a good example of theological interpretation of Scripture.

Don’t miss these special discounts on additional books by Levering and Scott Hahn:

  • Scott Hahn’s The Kingdom of God as Liturgical Empire: A Theological Commentary on 1–2 Chronicles, $1.99
  • Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation: The Mediation of the Gospel through Church and Scripture, $7.99
  • Encountering the Living God in Scripture: Theological and Philosophical Principles for Interpretation, $9.99

Logos partners with Baker Academic this month for their Free Book of the Month promotion in November. Add William Hendricksen’s commentary on Romans for free to your Logos Library. Originally published in 1981 in two volumes, this commentary reflects a classic Reformed view of Romans and years of preparation. Hendricksen was Professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary from 1942 to 1952. After Hendricksen died in 1982 Simon Kistemaker (Reformed Theological Seminary) finished the series. 

Logos is offering several other commentaries from Baker at deep discounts. The Understanding the Bible Commentary was formerly the New International Biblical Commentary, published by Hendricksen. When Baker acquired the series they renamed it and updated the covers, but as far as I know the content is identical. Although they are brief commentaries, I have always found them quite helpful.

The Teach the Text Commentary Series  attempts to bridge the gap between exegetical and devotional commentaries “by utilizing the best of biblical scholarship and providing the information a pastor needs to communicate the text effectively.” Here is a video trailer for the series from Baker Academic.

  • Donald Hagner, Hebrews (Understanding the Bible Commentary), $1.99
  • Robert Chisholm, 1 & 2 Samuel (Teach the Text Commentary Series), $2.99
  • Craig C. Broyles, Psalms (Understanding the Bible Commentary), $3.99
  • William Hendricksen, John (Hendriksen & Kistemaker New Testament Commentary), $5.99
  • Edward Curtis, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs (Teach the Text Commentary Series), $7.99
  • Simon J. Kistemaker, James and the Epistles of John (Hendriksen & Kistemaker New Testament Commentary), $9.99

As with all Logos books, these commentaries fully utilize  the features of Logos Bible Software, including fully searchable text, links to other resources in your library, and robust note taking tools.

I did a “First Look and Review” of the newest version of Logos Bible Software. Logos 9 was released in late October and is worth a look. Do want to invest any money in Logos yet? Version 8 is still available in a basic free edition. Download the basic edition and add the free books. You can always upgrade later. Don’t forget, you can purchase the Collector’s Edition of Logos 9 or a pretty nice car.

These Logos resources are available only until the end of November 2020. Be sure to load up on these resources while you can!

 

Logos Bible Software 9 – A First Look and Review

I have been using Logos Bible Software since the middle 1990s. My first copy shipped on floppy discs and I have a fairly large stack of CDROMs from the early days of Logos. Hardly a day goes by when I do not use the desktop version and I regularly use the iPad to read books and take notes. It has now been two years since Logos 8 was released (read my review of Logos 8 here). That was a major upgrade in terms of program speed and tools for Bible Study. This latest incarnation of Logos continues to develop tools for note taking, sermon preparation, and integration with other the Faithlife products. In fact, many of the major upgrades are “under the hood.”

I have been working with the beta of Logos 9 for a couple of months on my 2015 Mac Air (1.6 GHz Dual-Core Intel Core i5 with 8GB of memory). I do use a second monitor, but I am testing Logos on a fairly average machine. Since I only have a 256GB hard drive, I only download books I am regularly using in order to save space, although Logos resources are not usually very large files. With the last update, Logos functions well on this particular setup and I have no complaints about performance in the new version. The more robust platforms will (obviously) perform better. Those of you still using that 386 PC clone with a 40MB hard drive should consider upgrading your hardware soon.   

As with any upgrade, there are many more features than I can cover in a single review. Here is a six minute video from Logos summarizing the new features:

Many of the features I personally do not use. For example, I usually prepare my lectures and Bible studies using Word rather than Logos’s sermon prep or workflow tools. As cool as those features are, I just do not have the time to master them and the “old ways” still work fine. In fact, this new edition of Logos should appeal to the busy pastor looking to go deeper in their Bible study by streamlining the processes used for sermon and Bible study development. In addition, Logos has added dozens of counseling guides for specific situations and the Jay Adams Counseling Commentaries in many of the packages.

There are several new interlinear Bibles available, and a very interesting Reverse Interlinear Explorer tool. Pick any verse, and the Explorer will create an interlinear with lemma, transliteration, root, morphology, and link to the Greek-English Lexicon Based on Semantic Domains (Louw-Nida). The Interlinear Explorer is similar but adds Strong’s Numbers and a graphic visualization of variations in word order and punctuation.

One other feature that gets people excited is is Dark Mode. Logos 9 can do dark mode now, if you are into that sort of thing. Seriously, add dark mode to a program and people go crazy with joy. I personally do not get it. I tried it, and turned it off after a few minutes on my laptop. Maybe that is more exciting on a phone or iPad, but it was more distracting than helpful on my desktop version.

Factbook 2.0

One of the major upgrades in Logos 9 is the Factbook. In some ways this is similar to a Passage Study or a Bible Word Story, but much more. If you type a topic or passage in the Go Box, one option is to open the Factbook.  Another way to access the Factbook Words underlined in your Bible. This link creates a Factbook page full of links to resources in your library. Here is a quick video tutorial on using Factbook”

The key link is Lexham Bible Dictionary, which makes sense because it is in all base packages, including the free basic Logos (at least in version 8, check to see if this is true in Logos 9). Following the key link is a media tab. The Factbook searches your library for photographs or maps that relate to your topic. Only the highlights are provided, but the user can open the media tool or search all of their media for their topic. Includes a few key passages, and then a section labeled “referred to as.” This will provide Greek and Hebrew words used to describe the topic. Clicking a Greek or Hebrew word will open the Lexham Research Lexicon. The Factbook also generates links to Bible dictionaries and other resources (journals, sermons, other books from your library). You can launch a Workflow from the fact book as well.

One of the final sections of the Factbook is “Further Reading.” Here the Factbook may link the user to Wikipedia in a new Logos window. Clicking a Greek or Hebrew word in Wikipedia does not open your lexicon, but that is probably not possible. A very cool feature of this section is a link to Google Maps for places. For example, using the Factbook for Nazareth I clicked on the map coordinates and Google Earth opens in a web browser so I can even visit Nazareth using Google Streetview. Not surprisingly, store link is included so you can go spend more money in the Logos bookstore!

Lexham Lexicons

Three new Lexham Lexicons: Greek New Testament, Hebrew Bible and Aramaic Portions of the Hebrew Bible draws on the data sets including in Logos. For example, the Senses and Sense Labels are taken from the Bible Sense Lexicon; References to Biblical people, places, and concepts are based on data from the Bible Knowledgebase; Hebrew and Aramaic equivalents is taken from an alignment of H.B. Swete’s The Old Testament in Greek and the Lexham Hebrew Bible; Phrases and clauses presented in example verses are based on The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament. Information regarding principal parts of verbs, genitive endings of nouns and adjectives, and English glosses are taken from data utilized in the Bible Word Study guide.

πέμπω (pempō), vb. send. fut.act. πέμψω; aor.act. ἔπεμψα; perf.act. πέπομφα; aor.pass. ἐπέμφθην; perf.mid. πέπεμμαι. Hebrew equivalent: שׁלח (2). Aramaic equivalent: שׁלח (2).  LTW πέμπω (Calling or Commission).

LTW refers to the Lexham Theological Wordbook, a resource included in most packages. It would be ideal if the editors include links to other theological lexicons, such as TDNT, TLNT, etc. Occasionally related words are included in the header.

After the heading, the Lexicon offers a series of syntactical usage of the word (noun, adjective, verb, etc.) with interlinear examples, then a section of Septuagint references. Unfortunately, these are not presented in interlinear format, only links are provided. This is true for the Alternate Corpus References (Apostolic Fathers, Josephus, OT Pseudepigrapha, and Classical Greek sources). Following the example uses, the lexicon gathers commentary sections (called “articles”. This is convenient since the link goes to the exact section of the commentary dealing with the word. References in this section are based on an analysis of the use of original language in over 7,000 commentaries, the Lemma in Passage data and is influenced by Important Words data. Finally, if available, journal articles are list. For example, under περίεργος (“busybody”) there is a link to Jeannine K. Brown, “Just a Busybody? A Look at the Greco-Roman Topos of Meddling for Defining Ἀλλοτριεπίσκοπος in 1 Peter 4:15,” Journal of Biblical Literature 125 (2006): 552.

The Lexham Lexicon of the Hebrew Bible and the Aramaic Portions are similar, the heading includes the Greek equivalent from the LXX when available. As with the Greek lexicon, each example is presented in interlinear format. 

Lexham Research Commentaries

Like Factbook 2.0 and the new Lexham Lexicons, the Lexham Research Commentaries make use of datasets across the Logos ecosystem. What is a “research commentary”? This resource is edited by Miles Custis, Douglas Mangum, and Wendy Widder as a way of bringing all the resources of the Logos Library into a commentary-like format. The guides are a research tool presenting a wide range of interpretive issues raised by Bible scholars. The idea of these Research Commentaries is similar to Allan Ross’s Creation and Blessing, a commentary on Genesis which often pointed out what a pastor or teacher needs to sort out before actually teaching the text. Like the Factbook or Passage Study tool, the Research commentaries add data from various places in the Logos ecosystem to a brief commentary to guide a student into deeper research. For more details on these commentaries, see my review here.

Lexham Context Commentary

These two new resources for the Old and New Testament were edited by Douglas Mangum (project editor) and Thomas Parr and Mark Ward, associate editors (with an introduction by Leland Ryken). The goal is to provide quick access to the context of any portion of the Old or New Testament by offering outlines each book and summaries of every portion of the books. These brief notes ask, “Where have we been, where are we, and where are we going?

Manuscripts of the Hebrew Bible, Greek New Testament, and Septuagint

Another set of resources includes information about Greek New Testament, Greek Septuagint,  and Hebrew Bible manuscripts. These resources contain information about each manuscript and, where available, links to manuscript images. This data is drawn from the New Testament Virtual Manuscript Room (NTVMR). Many of the images require an account at NTVMR. At the time I used these resources there were too many “image not available” errors, but I expect that to improve.

Other Language Tools

Greek Grammar Ontology is edited by Jimmy Parks, this new resource is an effort to bring vocabulary and concepts of Greek Grammar into the Factbook. It is essentially a gigantic index of resources on morphology and syntax. For example, click on “Objective Genitive” in the index. The entry starts with a basic definition (“As an adjectival use of the genitive, the objective genitive indicates a verbal concept where the genitive noun is the object of the verbal idea”) followed by resources categorized as beginning (Zacharias, Biblical Greek Made Simple (reviewed here) Mounce), intermediate (shorter Robertson, shorter Wallace, Porter’s Idioms), and research (Robertson, Wallace, BDF  and Smyth). There is also a link to the Factbook, which appears to generate the same sort of information but with the other categories usually found in the factbook (when available).

Greek Prepositions in the New Testament: A Cognitive-Functional Approach by Rachel Aubrey and Michael Aubrey. This is book is designed to be referenced from the new Lexham Lexicons but offers deeper information on how prepositions function in the Greek New Testament. As most first year Greek students know, any given preposition has a wide range of meaning depending on the context. This resource unpacks that complicated syntax with example from the Greek New Testament. At this time the resource only covers proper prepositions, but will be updated to improper prepositions in a future.  

Conclusion. For any new version, the main question is, “is it worth the upgrade?” If you are using any version prior to Logos 8, then absolutely. If you are happy with Logos 8, you might consider a minimal upgrade in order to take advantage of the updated datasets. Since this is a new release, Logos is offering upgrade discounts, click the links and pick an upgrade path that fits your budget. If you are a first time Logos customer, there are some free books and other perks for you.

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for November 2020 – William Hendricksen, Romans

Hendricksen, Romans CommentaryLogos partners with Baker Academic this month for their Free Book of the Month promotion in November. Add William Hendricksen’s commentary on Romans for free to your Logos Library. Originally published in 1981 in two volumes, this commentary reflects a classic Reformed view of Romans and years of preparation. Hendricksen was Professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary from 1942 to 1952. After Hendricksen died in 1982 Simon Kistemaker (Reformed Theological Seminary) finished the series. 

Logos is offering several other commentaries from Baker at deep discounts. The Understanding the Bible Commentary was formerly the New International Biblical Commentary, published by Hendricksen. When Baked acquired the series they renamed it and updated the covers, but as far as I know the content is identical. Although they are brief commentaries, I have always found them quite helpful.

The Teach the Text Commentary Series  attempts to bridge the gap between exegetical and devotional commentaries “by utilizing the best of biblical scholarship and providing the information a pastor needs to communicate the text effectively.” Here is a video trailer for the series from Baker Academic.

  • Donald Hagner, Hebrews (Understanding the Bible Commentary), $1.99
  • Robert Chisholm, 1 & 2 Samuel (Teach the Text Commentary Series), $2.99
  • Craig C. Broyles, Psalms (Understanding the Bible Commentary), $3.99
  • William Hendricksen, John (Hendriksen & Kistemaker New Testament Commentary), $5.99
  • Edward Curtis, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs (Teach the Text Commentary Series), $7.99
  • Simon J. Kistemaker, James and the Epistles of John (Hendriksen & Kistemaker New Testament Commentary), $9.99

As with all Logos books, these commentaries fully utilize  the features of Logos Bible Software, including fully searchable text, links to other resources in your library, and robust note taking tools.

These Logos resources are available only until the end of November 2020. Be sure to get these books while you can!

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for October 2020 – Peter T. Vogt, Interpreting the Pentateuch: An Exegetical Handbook

Logos partners with Kregel Academic this month for their Free Book of the Month as well as several other Old Testament resources at deep discounts. For the month of October, you can download Peter T. Vogt, Interpreting the Pentateuch: An Exegetical Handbook (Handbooks for Old Testament Exegesis). I have reviewed several of the volumes in this series and they have all been excellent introductions to both critical issues as well as guides for exegesis and preaching.

In addition to this free book, Logos has great discounts on the following Kregel Academic books:

  • Robert B. Chisholm, Interpreting the Historical Books: An Exegetical Handbook (Handbooks for Old Testament Exegesis) – $1.99
  • Eugene Merrill, A Commentary on 1 & 2 Chronicles (Kregel Exegetical Library) – $3.99 (Link to my review)
  • Duane Garrett, A Commentary on Exodus (Kregel Exegetical Library) – $5.99 (Link to my review)
  • Jason S. DeRouchie, What the Old Testament Authors Really Cared About: A Survey of Jesus’ Bible – $7.99 (Link to my review)

These books utilize all the features of Logos Bible Software, including fully searchable text, links to other resources in your library, and robust note taking tools.

See my reviews of previous volumes in the Handbooks for Old Testament Exegesis series:

On October 15, Logos added a few more books to their free/almost free offerings, all theology from T&T Clark

  • Thomas Guarino, Foundations of Systematic Theology, Free!
  • The Theology of St. Cyril of Alexandria, $4.99
  • David Torevell, Losing the Sacred: Ritual, Modernity and Liturgical Reform, $7.99
  • Alcuin Reid, T&T Clark Companion to Liturgy, 9.99

 

Logos Commentary Sale

Logos is also running a sale on their best rated commentaries. Save up to 50% on excellent resources such as Doug Moo’s Romans volume in the The New International Commentary on the New Testament or Greg Beale’s Revelation commentary in the New International Greek Text Commentary series. Pick up individual volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary (Longenecker’s Galatians, for example) and the Anchor Bible commentary (Propp’s two volumes on Exodus, for example), and the NIV Application Commentary. there are plenty of other series represented at every level, from high-end academic to pastoral expositional commentaries.

These Logos resources are available only until the end of October 2020. Be sure to get these books while you can!

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for September 2020 – The Expositor’s Bible Commentary

Logos is offering a great Free Book of the Month as well as some real gems at deep discounts. For the month of September, you can download the The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 8: Matthew, Mark, Luke for free. D. A. Carson wrote the Matthew commentary, Walter W. Wessel wrote Mark, and Walter L. Liefeld wrote Luke.

This free volume (and the Isaiah Jeremiah volume for $1.99) was published in 1984. The Expositor’s Bible Commentary has been extremely popular over the years, reflecting some of the best evangelical scholarship at the time, yet targeting pastors, teachers and lay-people. The body of the commentary deals with the main features of the text and interacts with the biblical languages in more detailed notes. When I am asked by recent college graduates what commentary series the should buy, this is the series I recommend.

As always Logos has a few more volumes in the series at extremely reasonable prices:

  • The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 6: Isaiah (Geoffrey W. Grogan), Jeremiah (Charles L. Feinberg), Lamentations (H. L. Ellison), Ezekiel (Ralph H. Alexander), $1.99
  • The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 11: Romans–Galatians (Revised Edition), Everett F. Harrison, Donald A. Hagner, Robert K. Rapa, $2.99
  • The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 3: 1 Samuel–2 Kings (Revised Edition), Ronald F. Youngblood, Richard D. Patterson, Hermann Austel, $3.99
  • The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 5: Psalms, (Revised Edition), by Willem A. VanGemeren, $9.99
  • The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 12: Ephesians–Philemon (Revised Edition), William W. Klein, Todd Still, Robert L. Thomas, $16.99 (50% off)
  • The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 13: Hebrews-Revelation (Revised Edition), R. T. France, George Guthrie, J. Daryl Charles, Tom Thatcher, Alan F. Johnson $18.99 (50% off)

Not sold yet? Here is a short video on the Revised Expositor’s Bible Commentary:

 

Usually about mid-month Logos adds another set of free and discounted books, so starting September 9, you can get Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, Books 1–5 (The Fathers of the Church; Catholic University of America, 1953). This translation is more up-to-date than Krisopp Lake’s 1923 translation in the Loeb Library, although unlike the Loeb edition this book only contains the English translation of the first five books of Ecclesiastical History. There are a few additional books with great discounts, so visit the page for all the deals.

If you do not already own Logos, you can get the basic edition for free and read these books, or get Logos Fundamentals for 50% off for a limited time. This is a collection of 53 resources for $49.95. Follow that link and you can select one additional resource for free and choose a few more for $1.99 each. Try using the code PARTNEROFFER8 at checkout.

Logos Commentary Sale

Logos is also running a sale on their best rated commentaries. Save up to 50% on excellent resources such as Doug Moo’s Romans volume in the The New International Commentary on the New Testament or Greg Beale’s Revelation commentary in the New International Greek Text Commentary series. Pick up individual volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary (Longenecker’s Galatians, for example) and the Anchor Bible commentary (Propp’s two volumes on Exodus, for example), and the NIV Application Commentary. there are plenty of other series represented at every level, from high-end academic to pastoral expositional commentaries.

These Logos resources are available only until the end of September 2020. Be sure to get these books while you can!

Another Free Book from Logos – Joseph A. Fitzmyer, A Christological Catechism: New Testament Answers

In addition to their regular promotion, Logos often offers “another free book of the month.” For August 2020, they are giving away a copy of Joseph A. Fitzmyer, A Christological Catechism: New Testament Answers (New and Revised Edition; Paulist, 1993). Fitzmyer is well-known for his commentaries on Luke, Romans, Acts and Philemon in the Anchor Bible commentary series as well as several early volumes on the Dead Sea Scrolls.

In this popular work, Fitzmyer asks (and answers) twenty-five questions about Jesus. The book covers a wide range of issues including the virgin birth, the infancy narratives, Jesus’ claim to be the Messiah, the historical accuracy and significance of the resurrection and ascension texts, the place of Peter and the apostles, the importance of the apocryphal gospels, and more. The answers are from the perspective of Roman Catholicism (the book has nihil obstat and imprimatur ensuring the book is “free of doctrinal or moral error”), but many of these questions and answers reflect contemporary scholarship and theology as much as church tradition.

Sticking to the Roman Catholic Christology theme, Logos has also discounted several additional resources:

Fitzmyer’s free book and these discounted resources are only available through the end of August 2020.

Want more free books for Logos? Check out the other collection of free and discounted books for August 2020. Logos is also running a “back to school” sale on base packages and other reference materials, here are my comments and recommendations.

 

Back to School Sale at Logos Bible Software

Logos Back to School Sale

The summer is rapidly coming to an end and the new school year is starting. This means Logos Bible Software is running their annual back-to-School sale, with decent discounts on Logos 8 Base packages as well as a few key resources ideal for the Biblical Studies student.

Logos 8 Academic Premium is 25% off. This package includes the Yale Anchor Bible Dictionary, the two-volume Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, Nestle-Aland 28, the Louw and Nida Lexicon, Liddell and Scott Greek Lexicon, both TDNT and Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament (EDNT), and a slew of other Greek resources. For Hebrew, the bundle as Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia: SESB 2.0 Version with Apparatus and the eight volume The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew. In all, there are more than 390 resources. Scroll around, there are plenty of other bundles targeting more theologically minded readers (as well as people with plenty of money, the Diamond collection is also 40% off).

Here are a few things that caught my eye:

  • A Greek–English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, 3rd ed. (BDAG) is only $89.99. If you have not invested in BDAG yet, now is the time. It rarely is on sale, and well worth the money for anyone working in the Greek New Testament. You can link this lexicon to your Greek Bible, click on the word and the lexicon will open to the entry for that lemma.
  • Dictionary of Classical Hebrew, edited by D. J. A. Clines is 40% off. This is a great deal, you should not hesitate to add this to your collection and experience the joy of clicking a Hebrew word and having this lexicon open to the exact entry.
  • The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek (BrillDAG) is 42% off. This is still pricey, but it is a massive up-to-date lexicon for Classical Greek.

The sale has sections for Ancient Languages, Ministry & Practical Theology, History, Biblical Studies and Reference works. If you already have some resources in a package, Logos will give you a dynamic price,” meaning they do not include the books you already own in the price. For example, I already had some volumes of the Dictionary of Classical Hebrew, so my price was 40% off the volumes I did not already own. The same is true for base packages, so head to the sale page and check out your “dynamic price.”

in case you missed it, the Logos Free Book of the Month for August 2020 is J. Louis Martyn, History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel (Third Edition). Grab this book for free, and two volumes of the Hermenia series, Paul J. Achtemeier, 1 Peter (1996) for $1.99 and John Collins, Daniel (1993), for $5.99. You can get Brevard Childs, The Book of Exodus (The Old Testament Library, 1974) for $.99 and Walther Eichrodt’s two volume classic Theology of the Old Testament, Volumes One & Two (1961, 1967) for $9.99.

The Back to School Sale ends soon, so start abusing those student loans now.