Logos Free Book of the Month for May 2019 – I. Howard Marshall, ICC Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles

The Logos Free book of the Month for May 2019 is I. Howard Marshall, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles (T&T Clark, Hb. 1999, Pb. 2013). This is a tremendous gift from Logos since Marshall’s commentary is a major contribution to scholarship on the Pastoral Epistles.The print version of this commentary in the cheaper paperback format is available on Amazon for $65, good luck finding hardback copies (list price $155)! In addition to the price, the major advantage of owning the book in the Logos library is all the Logos tools are available to reader. This goes far beyond simple searching and highlighting.

At over 900 pages, this commentary is one of the most comprehensive exegetical commentaries available. Marshall wrote the commentary in collaboration with Philip Towner, the author of the NICNT commentary on the Pastoral Epistles (Eerdmans 2006) as well as the short commentary in the IVP New Testament Commentary series.

I listed Marshall’s commentary in my “Top Five Commentaries on the Pastoral epistles” a few years ago. I said:

Marshall’s contribution is perhaps the most detailed exegetical commentary on the list, as is to be expected from an ICC volume. Marshall replaced Walter Lock’s 1924 commentary in the series. The book caused a stir when it was released since Marshall (beloved by many evangelicals) rejected Pauline authorship of these letters. The introduction to the commentary develops Marshall’s view of authorship. The body of the commentary contains detailed bibliographies for each section followed by an overview of the text. The format of the commentary is a phrase-by-phrase unpacking of the Greek text, including textual, lexical and syntactical issues. He interacts with a broad range of scholarship, with Marshall includes a number of excellent excurses (on Household Codes, in Titus, for example).

The International Critical Commentary has been one of the top critical commentaries for well over 100 years. Each commentary in the series comments on the Hebrew or Greek text, dealing with textual, syntactical, and lexicial issues. As with most commentary series, this commentary by Marshall replaced the 1924 volume by Walter Lock. Lock’s commentary had 46 pages of introduction and 159 pages dealing with exegetical issues for all three Pastoral Epistles. It is still available through Logos (and is often found used for $10 or so).

In addition to Marshall’s commentary, Logos is offering both volumes of C. K. Barrett’s Acts commentary in the ICC series for $1.99 and $2.99 each. Barrett is always worth reading and this Acts commentary is no exception. The two volumes were published in 1994 and 1998 and offer solid exegetical comments are remarkably readable. With respect to historicity, Barrett said “Where he agrees with other historical sources, his evidence is confirmed; where he disagrees, or where other evidence is lacking, he must at least be taken seriously (2:cxiv).

Logos usually does a related giveaway on their Free Book promo page. This month you can enter to win the The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew edited by David J.A. Clines (8 vols.; Sheffield,1993–2011; $299 value). This is an exceptional lexicon for serious students of the Hebrew Bible. In many ways the lexicon is like HALOT (Brill, 1994-2000) but is far more comprehensive and includes references to the Qumran literature. Enter early and often, Logos will give the Lexicon away to some lucky winner at the end of the month.

Logos recently released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. Logos base packages are 20% off through May 31. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will preserve your credit rating.

These three and almost free books of the month are only available through the end of May, so head to the Logos site and get them before the offer expires.

New International Commentary for Logos Sale

NICNT Sale Logos

Logos is running a great sale on volumes of the New International Commentary series from Eerdmans. This includes both the Old Testament series and the New Testament series. Through May 15, 2019 volumes in this series are up to 43% off, including the most recent volumes.

In general, these commentaries are based on the English text with technical lexicial and syntactical information in the the footnotes. These are nonetheless academic commentaries. As with most commentary series, the later volumes are generally more detailed than the earlier ones. The NICNT editor Joel Green characterized the series as “faithful criticism”  which serve “pastors, students, and scholars alike for its attention to the text of Scripture, its currency with contemporary scholarship, and its service to the global church.”

I have reviewed several of these commentaries , so click through to the full reviews on these volumes.

So what else is good in the NICOT/NICNT series? Joel Green, The Gospel of Luke (NICNT 1997) was a renaissance for the series, replacing Geldenhuys’ venerable contribution to the series.Geldenhuys was good, but not as detailed Green’s excellent commentary. Green is now the general editor of the NICNT series, following Ned Stonehouse, F. F. Bruce, and Gordon Fee. Gareth Lee Cockerill on Hebrews and Scot McKnight on James are both excellent. I have also used R. T. France on Matthew

In the Old Testament, I have used Victor Hamilton on Genesis. David Tsumura on 1 Samuel is one of the best on that historical book available. Tremper Longman on Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon are both good commentaries. Daniel Block’s two volumes on Ezekiel are excellent. However, unlike the New Testament volumes, there are fewer recent contributions to the NICOT. Leslie Allen on The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah (1978) Peter C. Craigie on Deuteronomy and Marten H. Woudstra on Joshua (1981) are now nearly forty years old and ready for replacement.

Be aware that some commentaries appear in a first and second edition (Romans) or a original and revised edition (1 Corinthians). It is good Logos has chosen to offer both the editions, but you may want to only purchase the most recent version (see my review of Moo’s second edition of his Romans commentary for a comparison of the two editions). I noticed some of the newer editions are at a much lower discount, so you might prefer to get the older commentary at a deeper discount.In some cases replaced volumes are still available, such as James Adamson’s 1976 James commentary, now replaced by McKnight’s 2011 commentary.

In November 2018 Logos launched a major upgrade to their Bible Study software, I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything runs faster than Logos 7 so the upgrade is well worth getting.  If you do not already have Logos, get Logos 8 Fundamentals for $99 then upgrade to a Logos 8 base package. Try using the code READINGACTS8, might save you some money.

The NICOT/NICNT Commentary series sale expires at the end of February, so head to the Sale page and load up on excellent professional commentaries for your Logos library.

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for April 2019 – Charles Quarles, A Theology of Matthew

The Logos Free book of the Month for April 2019 is Charles Quarles, A Theology of Matthew: Jesus Revealed as Deliverer, King, and Incarnate Creator (P&R, 2013).

This book is part of the Explorations in Biblical Theology from P & R Publishing. Doug Moo said “Using key Old Testament figures and themes as his framework, Charles Quarles summarizes very nicely Matthew’s main theological ideas. The book is marked by an admirable combination of biblical exposition and practical application.” As the title implies, Quarles highlights Jesus the fulfillment of the Old Testament. One-time biblio-blogger Jennifer Guo described this series as “offering believers substantial biblical and theological content at a popular-level of readability and accessibility.”

Logos usually adds two more books from the same publisher for “almost free.” In addition to the Quarles book, you can add two volumes of the The Gospel According to the Old Testament series from P&R. For $1.99 you can add Tremper Longman’s Immanuel in Our Place: Seeing Christ in Israel’s Worship (P&R 2001) and for $2.99 Mark Boda’s After God’s Own Heart: The Gospel According to David (P&R, 2007). Philip Ryken says “As Mark Boda shows in this useful and accessible book, the house of David is central to the Bible’s message of salvation.” Commenting on Longman, Bruce Waltke heartily recommends the book saying “Christians struggle in understanding the relevance of large parts of the Old Testament, particularly concerning the worship of ancient Israel. In this beautifully conceived work, Longman has illuminated the priestly material in a way that makes it theologically relevant for today.”

The bottom line is that you can add three excellent books to your Logos Library for about $5. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to enter the Logos giveaway for the month, a four-volume A Theology of Lordship collection from P&R.

If you are interested in reformed theology, Logos has several collections from P&R Publishing on sale in April, including a twelve volume collection of John Frame books and the twenty-seven volume Reformed Expository Commentary (many volumes written by Philip Graham Ryken).

Logos recently released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will preserve your credit rating.

Logos Discounts on Hebrews and John Commentaries

Every year Logos does a March Madness type tournament contest, often playing various sixty-four theologians against each, and then offering increasingly deep discounts on their titles in the Logos library. This year they decided to use the books pf the Bible and discount bundles of resources. The winner was Hebrews, so a nice collection of Hebrews resources is 60% off for the Month of March. The Gospel of John was the runner up and is 57% off.  All other books of the Bible collection resources are between 35%-55% off.  these collections include a nice mix of academic resources (Hermenia, NICNT, New International Greek Testament Commentary), popular commentaries (NAC, Tyndale, IVP New Testament Commentary Series) and classic commentaries (Spurgeon Commentary).  I notice the Hebrews collection also included the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture.

The collections are also “dynamically priced,” which is Logos-speak for not charging you for a resource twice. Scroll down to the list of resources in the collection, change the little box from “All” to “New to You.”  Here is another tip: if you see a book you want in the collection but do not want to get the whole collection, try searching on it individually. I see there are three Library of the New Testament monographs on Hebrews, well worth buying at 60% off. For Hebrews:

For the Gospel of John:

The real question is, do you really need thirty more books on Hebrews or John? The answer is, Yes. Yes you do.

I have mentioned this earlier in the month, so this is a last-week-of-March reminder. Logos runs sales on books and collects every month. For the rest of March, there are plenty of good books available with decent discounts. There are dozens of books and sets on sale, here are a few highlights, ranging from the affordable to the less-affordable. They have a few Community Bid items in the list, such as all twenty-two volumes of Plutarch’s Lives for $30 of the thirty-six volumes of the Select Works of Cicero for $55 (compare that to the Loeb editions at $15-18 used if you can find them). Although I much prefer to have the real paper versions of books, the discounts on some of these items are good enough they are hard to pass up.

There are many more books in biblical, theological, and historical studies, as well as Christian Living, Church Life, and a few random “staff picks.” These are the books which caught my eye, visit the sale page yourself and see what you can find.

Larry Hurtado, Honoring the Son: Jesus in Earliest Christian Devotional Practice(Lexham, 2018), $9.99. I reviewed this book soon after it was published.

As David Capes says in his introduction to this slender volume, “behind each paragraph is an article or monograph. . .” (ix). In fact, the body of this book is a mere sixty-eight pages plus another seven pages of appendix, eleven pages of bibliography and five pages of indices. But brevity should not be mistaken for sketchiness. Hurtado succeeds in summarizes and updated the arguments made in his earlier and more substantial works and provides enough bibliographical material to enable the reader to explore the details of the argument of the book. The book is written to appear to layperson, student and professional interested in the development of a high Christology in the early church.

David Clines, The Theme of the Pentateuch (Second Edition; Sheffield Academic, 1997), $13.99 (currently $30+ on Amazon). I read the first edition of this book and have used the basic thesis of the book for my OT Lit classes for more that twenty years.

Donald E. Gowan,Theology in Exodus: Biblical Theology in the Form of a Commentary (WJKP, 1994), $19.95. I have enjoyed several other works by McGowen, but I have not read this one. Having just taught through Exodus, this biblical theology of Exodus might be a good read.

H. G. M. Williamson, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Isaiah 6-12 (T&T Clark,2018), $24.95 (cheap paperback version on Amazon for $39.95, hardbacks are $100+). This is the second part Williamson’s ICC Commentary on Isaiah, and well worth the money for a professional, high end commentary on Isaiah.

I bought Sheffield Academic Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls (12 vols). At only $85, this is an excellent value. The collection includes Geza Vermes’ The Dead Sea Scrolls in English (1995) as well as his brief Scrolls, Scriptures and Early Christianity. There are also introductions to The Damascus Texts, The Exegetical Texts, The Purity Texts, The Temple Scroll and Related Texts and The War Texts (1 QM and Related Manuscripts).

There are several bundles of Library of Hebrew Bible texts from the Journal for the Study of OT or NT Supplement series. For example, the Library of Hebrew Bible/OT Studies: JSOTS on Nevi’im (7 vols.) is $84.99; T&T Clark Old Testament in the New Testament Collection (15 vols.) is a bit more of an investment at $179.99. The set includes The Followers of Jesus as the ‘Servant’: Luke’s Model from Isaiah for the Disciples in Luke-Acts by Holly Beers (which I reviewed for RBL) and both volumes of Brian J. Abasciano’s Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9 (which I have used extensively and highly recommend).  These professional monographs are often the publication of a doctoral dissertation or collections of essays from an SBL session. Although some readers will balk at the high price of these collections, the hardback editions usually run $125 per volume, when they are released in paperback they are still in the $40 range.

Another pricey reference book which works great in the Logos ecosystem in The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek (Brill, 2015, $89.99). This new lexicon (sometimes called BrillDAG) was on sale at the last SBL for $99 in print, but it is a much better tool in Logos since you can link directly from the Greek New Testament to the lexicon entry.  From the book blurb, “translation of Franco Montanari’s Vocabolario della Lingua Greca. With an established reputation as the most important modern dictionary for Ancient Greek, it brings together 140,000 headwords taken from the literature, papyri, inscriptions and other sources of the archaic period up to the 6th Century CE, and occasionally beyond.” Here is a link for a review of this lexicon on Bryn Mawr Classical Review.

Logos recently launched a major upgrade, I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything runs faster than Logos 7 so the upgrade is well worth getting.  If you do not already have Logos, get Logos 8 Fundamentals for $99 then upgrade to a Logos 8 base package. Try using the code READINGACTS8, might save you some money.

The Logos Bible Software Free and almost free books of the month are three excellent books by Leland Ryken. Ryken was professor of English at Wheaton College written extensively on classic literature from a Christian perspective, including the The Christian Imagination: The Practice of Faith in Literature and Writing and the classic How to Read the Bible as Literature (Zondervan 1984). Ryken served as the “literary stylist” for the English Standard Version (Crossway 2001) and was edited IVP’s Dictionary of Biblical Imagery (1998). Like the March sale, the free and almost free books expire at the end of this month.

In case you have not seen the announcements, Logos released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will require you to mortgage your house.

These discounts expire at the end of March, so head to the sale page and load up on excellent professional resources for your Logos library.

 

Logos Bible Software Resource Discounts for March 2019

Logos runs sales on books and collects every month and there is plenty of good books available with decent discounts. There are dozens of books and sets on sale, here are a few highlights, ranging from the affordable to the less-affordable. They have a few Community Bid items in the list, such as all twenty-two volumes of Plutarch’s Lives for $30 of the thirty-six volumes of the Select Works of Cicero for $55 (compare that to the Loeb editions at $15-18 used if you can find them). Although I much prefer to have the real paper versions of books, the discounts on some of these items are good enough they are hard to pass up.

There are many more books in biblical, theological, and historical studies, as well as Christian Living, Church Life, and a few random “staff picks.” These are the books which caught my eye, visit the sale page yourself and see what yo can find.

Larry Hurtado, Honoring the Son: Jesus in Earliest Christian Devotional Practice(Lexham, 2018), $9.99. I reviewed this book soon after it was published.

As David Capes says in his introduction to this slender volume, “behind each paragraph is an article or monograph. . .” (ix). In fact, the body of this book is a mere sixty-eight pages plus another seven pages of appendix, eleven pages of bibliography and five pages of indices. But brevity should not be mistaken for sketchiness. Hurtado succeeds in summarizes and updated the arguments made in his earlier and more substantial works and provides enough bibliographical material to enable the reader to explore the details of the argument of the book. The book is written to appear to layperson, student and professional interested in the development of a high Christology in the early church.

David Clines, The Theme of the Pentateuch (Second Edition; Sheffield Academic, 1997), $13.99 (currently $30+ on Amazon). I read the first edition of this book and have used the basic thesis of the book for my OT Lit classes for more that twenty years.

Donald E. Gowan,Theology in Exodus: Biblical Theology in the Form of a Commentary (WJKP, 1994), $19.95. I have enjoyed several other works by McGowen, but I have not read this one. Having just taught through Exodus, this biblical theology of Exodus might be a good read.

H. G. M. Williamson, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Isaiah 6-12 (T&T Clark,2018), $24.95 (cheap paperback version on Amazon for $39.95, hardbacks are $100+). This is the second part Williamson’s ICC Commentary on Isaiah, and well worth the money for a professional, high end commentary on Isaiah.

I am quite interested in the Sheffield Academic Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls (12 vols). At only $85, this is an excellent value. The collection includes Geza Vermes’ The Dead Sea Scrolls in English (1995) as well as his brief Scrolls, Scriptures and Early Christianity. There are also introductions to The Damascus Texts, The Exegetical Texts, The Purity Texts, The Temple Scroll and Related Texts and The War Texts (1 QM and Related Manuscripts).

There are several bundles of Library of Hebrew Bible texts from the Journal for the Study of OT or NT Supplement series. For example, the Library of Hebrew Bible/OT Studies: JSOTS on Nevi’im (7 vols.) is $84.99; T&T Clark Old Testament in the New Testament Collection (15 vols.) is a bit more of an investment at $179.99. The set includes The Followers of Jesus as the ‘Servant’: Luke’s Model from Isaiah for the Disciples in Luke-Acts by Holly Beers (which I reviewed for RBL) and both volumes of Brian J. Abasciano’s Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9 (which I have used extensively and highly recommend).  These professional monographs are often the publication of a doctoral dissertation or collections of essays from an SBL session. Although some readers will balk at the high price of these collections, the hardback editions usually run $125 per volume, when they are released in paperback they are still in the $40 range.

Another pricey reference book which works great in the Logos ecosystem in The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek (Brill, 2015, $89.99). This new lexicon (sometimes called BrillDAG) was on sale at the last SBL for $99 in print, but it is a much better tool in Logos since you can link directly from the Greek New Testament to the lexicon entry.  From the book blurb, “translation of Franco Montanari’s Vocabolario della Lingua Greca. With an established reputation as the most important modern dictionary for Ancient Greek, it brings together 140,000 headwords taken from the literature, papyri, inscriptions and other sources of the archaic period up to the 6th Century CE, and occasionally beyond.” Here is a link for a review of this lexicon on Bryn Mawr Classical Review.

Logos recently launched a major upgrade, I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything runs faster than Logos 7 so the upgrade is well worth getting.  If you do not already have Logos, get Logos 8 Fundamentals for $99 then upgrade to a Logos 8 base package. Try using the code READINGACTS8, might save you some money.

The Logos Bible Software Free and almost free books of the month are three excellent books by Leland Ryken. Ryken was professor of English at Wheaton College written extensively on classic literature from a Christian perspective, including the The Christian Imagination: The Practice of Faith in Literature and Writing and the classic How to Read the Bible as Literature (Zondervan 1984). Ryken served as the “literary stylist” for the English Standard Version (Crossway 2001) and was edited IVP’s Dictionary of Biblical Imagery (1998). Like the March sale, the free and almost free books expire at the end of this month.

In case you have not seen the announcements, Logos released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will require you to mortgage your house.

These discounts expire at the end of March, so head to the sale page and load up on excellent professional resources for your Logos library.

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for March 2019 – Leland Ryken, How Bible Stories Work

The Logos Bible Software Free and almost free books of the month are three excellent books by Leland Ryken. Ryken was professor of English at Wheaton College written extensively on classic literature from a Christian perspective, including the The Christian Imagination: The Practice of Faith in Literature and Writing and the classic How to Read the Bible as Literature (Zondervan 1984). Ryken served as the “literary stylist” for the English Standard Version (Crossway 2001) and was edited IVP’s Dictionary of Biblical Imagery (1998).

Ryken’s How Bible Stories Work is one of six volumes originally published by weaver but are now part of the Lexham Press catalog. Each are relatively short books (125-135 pages) and well-designed for quick reading.

  1. The Subject of Every Story: The Embodiment of Universal Human Experience
  2. Setting in Bible Stories: Seeing the Particulars
  3. Characterization in Bible Stories (Part 1): How Writers Do It
  4. Characterization in Bible Stories (Part 2): What Readers Need to Do
  5. Plot Structure and Unity: The Beginning, Middle, and Ending of Each Story
  6. Plot Devices: How Storytellers Tell Their Story with Beauty and Skill
  7. Hero Stories: A Neglected but Fruitful Narrative Genre
  8. From Story to Meaning: How to Find Significance in a Narrative Text

Each chapter focuses on specific narratives and include an exercise (“learning by doing”). For example, in the chapter on Hero Stories, Ryken outlines the way hero stories usually work, then reads Daniel 6 as an example of a biblical hero story used to teach moral virtue. Then he suggests Esther as an example of hero story, prints a series of verses from the book and asks the reader to do the literary analysis for themselves. For some readers, describing Daniel 6 or the Book of Esther as “hero stories” sounds like they are “just stories” and not really “true stories.” Ryken acknowledges this objection in the preface to the series:  “the literary approach to the Bible needs to be defended against legitimate fears by evangelical Christians, and through the years I have not scorned to clear the territory of misconceptions as part of my defense of a literary analysis of the Bible.” For Ryken, “a literary approach to the Bible is ready to grant value to the biblical authors’ skill with language and literary technique, seeing these as an added avenue to our enjoyment of the Bible.” But a literary approach to the Bible is not used in isolation, rather it is “takes its humble place alongside the two other main approaches—the theological and the historical.”

In Jesus the Hero: A Guided Literary Study of the Gospels ($1.99 for the month) Ryken first argues the Gospels are narratives and as such, the insights of literary studies are helpful in tracing the themes of the book. In Short Sentences Long Remembered: A Guided Study of Proverbs and Other Wisdom Literature ($2.99 for the month) Ryken examines a different genre of literature, that of proverbial wisdom. The book deals primarily with the Book of Proverbs and describes how short, proverbial sayings function in the wisdom literature of the Old Testament, but also in Beatitudes and other contexts (James).

The bottom line is that you can add three excellent, academic books to your Logos Library for about $5. Any of these books are worth the investment at full price, so a big thanks to Lexham and Logos for making them available so inexpensively. As of today, the giveaway is not open, but the Free Books page indicates Logos will do their usual context to give away a 40 volume collection of books published by originally Weaver (which was purchased by Lexham, so maybe this giveaway will be updated soon?)

In case you have not seen the announcements, Logos released a major upgrade to their Bible Software. I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything seems to run faster than Logos 7 and the upgrade is well worth considering. As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading and there are paths that will require you to mortgage your house. 

Anchor Bible Commentary for Logos Sale

Logos is running a great sale on volumes of the Yale Anchor Bible Commentary through the end of February 2019. All volumes of this series are only $19.95, including the most recent volumes. For example both volumes of Joel Marcus’s commentary on Mark are on sale for $19.95 each; the cheaper paperback versions cost nearly that much per volume (and new hardcovers are selling for up to $85!)  I really do prefer to have the real books, but at this price I can fill in some of the recent replacement volumes I have not been able to afford and use the features of the Logos library.

So what is good in the AB series? Joel Marcus on Mark, Fitzmyer on Luke (two volumes), Acts, Romans and 1 Corinthians are all worth using. Raymond Brown’s two volumes on the Gospel of John and addition volume on the Epistles of John are still worth using although they are a bit dated. The real steal is Louis Martyn’s Galatians commentary, new paperback copies are more that $50 on Amazon. Abraham Mahlerbe on 1-2 Thessalonians and Luke Timothy Johnson on 1-2 Timothy are both excellent.

For the Hebrew Bible, I recommend Jacob Milgrom’s three volumes on Leviticus (Vol. 1, 1–16, Vol. 2, 17-22 and Vol. 3, 23–27; one of the most detailed commentaries on Leviticus!) Both the Hosea and Amos commentaries by Anderson and Freedman are great (I have used Amos often). I have two of the three Joseph Blenkinsopp commentaries on Isaiah and find them useful.

The Anchor Bible Commentary included books from the Apocrypha as well. Most of these can be had used for less than $20, but there are relatively few commentaries on Sirach, Judith, Tobit, etc.

There are a few of the older AB commentaries on sale and I would not recommend them even at the sale price. I would not purchase the Genesis commentary by Speiser, for example. It is one of the original AB volumes and has yet to be replaced by a newer more detailed commentary. There are used copies everywhere for less that $10 (I see a copy on Amazon for less that $3!) The same is true for 1-2 Chronicles and the Ezra-Nehemiah volumes by Jacob Myers. Maybe the three volumes on the Psalms by Michael Dahood are in this category too, although these were better commentaries with a heavy emphasis on Ugaritic parallels. Despite being older, I think Marvin Pope’s commentaries on Job and Song of Solomon are both worth having (the SoS commentary is massive and filled with interesting interpretations of the Song!). The William Orr commentary on 1 Corinthians so not very good and has been replaced by Fitzmyer, but it is still available in this sale (you can get it used for $2 on Amazon). J. Massyngberde Ford’s Revelation commentary was replaced by Craig Koester. Ford’s commentary was brief and idiosyncratic (and is still pricey used, for some reason).

Logos recently launched a major upgrade, I did a “first look” review of Logos 8 here. There are plenty of new features to justify an upgrade and the software runs much more efficiently than the previous version. Everything runs faster than Logos 7 so the upgrade is well worth getting.  If you do not already have Logos, get Logos 8 Fundamentals for $99 then upgrade to a Logos 8 base package. Try using the code READINGACTS8, might save you some money.

The Anchor Bible Commentary sale expires at the end of February, so head to the Sale page and load up on excellent professional commentaries for your Logos library.