Logos Christmas Sale 2020

Logos Christmas Sale 2020

Logos has a nice collection of resources on sale through the end of the month. It does not look like they are doing an “advent calendar” this year where you have to check in every day. But there may be a few surprises, who knows? It’s Christmas!

As expected, a few of these are inexpensive “stocking stuffers” like Morna Hooker’s excellent The Gospel According to Saint Mark in the Black’s series (Free!) or Logos 8 Gospel Studies Library Expansion (72% off). I see a couple of New Studies in Biblical Theology for only a few dollars each. Poke around and see what you can find and stuff that stocking properly.

There are some really deep discounts on larger collections, if you have been waiting for a big sale at the end of the year, this is it:

  • Bible for Everyone Commentary Collection (35 vols.) 62% off, $119.99 sale price
  • Challies Recommends: Best Old Testament Commentaries (55 vols.) 50% off, $442.99 sale price
  • Romans-Philemon, 21 vols. (New Testament Technical Commentary Collection) 65% off, $232.99 sale price
  • New Studies in Biblical Theology Series Collection | NSBT (50 vols.) 52% off, $299.99 sale price
  • NIV Application Commentary: New Testament | NIVAC (20 vols) 55% off, $199.99 sale price
  • New International Commentary: Old Testament | NIC (28 vols.) 51% off, $499.99 sale price
  • Popular Patristics Series  Collection (53 vols) 54% off, $229.99 sale price
  • Ancient Christian Reference Collection (55 vols.) 50% off, $549.99 sale price
  • Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary | SHBC (36 vols.) 55% off, $499.99 sale price
  • Welwyn Commentary Series | WCS (56 vols.) 60% off, $199.99 sale price
  • New Covenant Commentary Series | NCCS (16 vols.) 54% off, $99.99 sale price
  • The Life Application Bible Commentary (17 vols.) 60% off, $49.99 sale price

Maybe it is time to get a base package or upgrade to Logos 9 (check out my review of the new version). All based packages are on sale for 15% off for the month of December. This includes the Starter level up to the the pricier packages like Silver, Gold, Diamond. Follow this link and save some of money and get a few freebies.

Archer Free Stuff Meme

Do not forget about the free book of the month from Crossway, Philip Ryken’s commentary on Exodus, Exodus: Saved for God’s Glory. Read my comments on this sale from December 1.  Through the end of December you can also  get Wilfrid J. Harrington’s Reading Mark for the First Time (Paulist , 2014) as well as some discounted Catholic resources.

If you do not have Logos yet, you should at least get the free basic version so you can take advantage of the free book of the month and the other sale resources.

Free Stuff At Christmas Meme

The Joy of a New Bible

Like most people who teach the Bible regularly, I have owned quite a few Bibles over the years. When I went to college my parents gave me a nice leather bound NIV Bible. I used that one for years be eventually had to retire it because the NIV translation had been revised several times. I tried several other Bibles but have never quite found one that had the same feel. I have a couple of well-worn NIV 2011 variations, and I am a sucker for a Crossway Readers edition. I even bought a goatskin ESV Psalms volume at ETS a few years ago (it is a beautiful book that will likely outlast me).

Since 2005, I have been using variations on the ESV Bible, settling eventually on a hardback ESV Study Bible soon after it was released in 2010. I have used that Bible in classes and in Bible studies for the last ten years, and it is looking a bit long in the tooth. The cover is loose and there are some awkward coffee stains in the Pauline epistles. I thought about a new edition of the NRSV (which I use in Logos Bible Software, and I do have a hardback with the Apocrypha handy in my office).

I recently upgraded the hardback ESV Study Bible to a nice TruTone binding of the same edition. It looks exactly like my comfortable old ESV, but it feels just a bit more special. I got the Bible from Personalized Bible, a website which focuses almost exclusively on Bibles.  I say almost exclusively, because non-Bibles sometimes turn up in searches.

Their website is very user-friendly, you can by translation (KJV, NIV, ESV, NKJV, NASB, NLT, HCSB), and then adjust the search by price of the Bible (in case you do not want to be tempted by those Cambridge calf-skin leather Bibles). They have a wide selection of Study Bibles in various translations, including the old Scofield Reference Bible (“if it was good enough for Paul, it is good enough for you”) and the Ryrie Study Bible.  

As for imprinting, they will do two lines for maximum of 25 characters each for an additional $7.99. Not every Bible can be customized, so look the imprintable Bibles if you want to add your name. This is also a good source for a gift and award Bibles that can be customized. They have both large print (12-point) and giant print (14-point) Bibles. Honestly, I did not know a giant print existed, but as I get older, that is more and more attractive. I noticed a “super giant print” 17-point ESV Bible. There is an economy giant print ESV ($8.54 each), churches might consider buying a case to help out the older folk who attended Bible studies.

The prices are competitive and they are lightning fast on shipping (even for a personalized Bible).  Check them out when you are in the market for a new Bible.

How can I buy a Personalized Bible?

 

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for August 2020 – J. Louis Martyn, History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel (Third Edition)

Logos is offering a great Free Book of the Month as well as some real gems at deep discounts. Logos is giving away J. Louis Martyn, History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel, 3rd ed. (The New Testament Library Series, 2003). Martyn is best known for his Anchor Bible commentary on Galatians and his association with the “Apocalyptic Paul.” The first (1968) and second (1979) edition of this book were influential, whether Martyn’s conclusions were accepted or not. This third edition reprints D. Moody Smith’s essay “The Contribution of J. Louis Martyn to the Understanding of the Gospel of John” from The Conversation Continues: Studies in Paul & John in Honor of J. Louis Martyn (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1990). Moody cites John Ashton’s Understanding the Fourth Gospel as presenting the work of Rudolf Bultmann and J. Louis Martyn the “two major pillars or benchmarks of Johannine scholarship in the twentieth century.”

In addition to this important monograph on John, Logos is offering the following resources for 90% or more off:

  • For $1.99, Paul J. Achtemeier, 1 Peter (Hermeneia, 1996)
  • For $3.99, Brevard Childs, The Book of Exodus (The Old Testament Library, 1974)
  • For $5.99, John Collins, Daniel (Hermeneia, 1993)
  • For $9.99, Walther Eichrodt, Theology of the Old Testament, Volumes One & Two (1961, 1967)

That is $22 for five excellent resources. If I were to put the “almost free” resources in order of importance, I would recommend Collins on Daniel first, then Achtemeier on 1 Peter. But that is just my preference, both Childs and Eichrodt are classics, and well worth the investment.

If you scroll down to the very bottom of the page, Logos is running a giveaway for the 33 volume Westminster Bible Companion Series. This series is concise, yet non-technical. ideal for individual study and for Bible study classes and groups. There are four ways to enter the giveaway, may the odds be in your favor.

If you do not already own Logos, you can get the basic edition for free and read these books, or get Logos Fundementals for 50% off for a limited time. This is a collection of 53 resources for $49.95. Follow that link and you can select one additional resource for free and choose a few more for $1.99 each. Try using the code PARTNEROFFER8 at checkout.

These Logos resources are available only until the end of August 2020. Be sure to get these books while you can!

 

Book Notice: Max J. Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind

I recently received a review copy of Max J. Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and his Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (WUNT/2 515; Tubingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2020. xxxv+658 pp. Pb; €139,00; Link to Mohr Siebeck). Since this is a lengthy book, I thought I would do a book notice based on first impressions now, with a lengthy review when I am able to finish the book.

Max Lee, Moral TransformationLee’s goal is “to fill some important gaps in the cultural encyclopedia of knowledge which Paul and his Greco-Roman audience assumed each other knew but we modern need to reconstruct” (p. 567). For the most part, this encyclopedia of knowledge on the philosophy of mind is unfamiliar to the New Testament scholar.

Since understanding Paul’s thought in a Jewish context dominates intertextual studies, so Lee focuses on the Greco Roman environment. He therefore proposes to study models of moral transformation in Middle Platonism (part 1), Stoicism (part 2). A future volume will address Epicureanism and Diaspora Judaism. The justification for using these examples is the preserved the orthodoxy of their founders with some significant innovations and were influential in the first century. Certainly, Cynics and Neo-Pythagoreans were active in the first century, but since neither were interested in controlling passions, Lee sets them aside in this book.

What is philosophy of the mind? Ancient philosophy of the mind is the study of the soul and the ethical implications of what the soul is and how it functions. This differs from modern philosophy of the mind which is interested in how the mind and the body relate. Ancient philosophy of the mind asks whether passions can be controlled. If so, what forces impede moral transformation? Is character pre-determined at birth? Or is character developed over time through training and education?

What is moral transformation? In the context of first century C.E. Greco-Roman philosophy, ethical systems were interested in transforming the “common barbarian sick with vice into a leading citizen of the Roman empire, capable of virtue” (p. 5).  Lee will focus on the language of power in each philosophical school in order to understand how passions act as forces which must be mastered. Moral transformation is there for control of the passions. What are the sources for controlling the passions? This may come through education, training, or asceticism. What is the relationship of theology and ethics? Do the gods enable moral transformation? If so, how central is this divine aid?

All three philosophical systems agree the human mind or reason is the main power source for self-mastery. But only when the human mind has been properly trained by philosophy (p. 15). Although it is not the topic this book, Lee suggests Diaspora Judaism shares much in common with Greco-Roman philosophy,  although it places much more emphasis on the role of the divine. Self-control is not merely a human action; God actively intervenes in the transformation of the soul. Late in the book Lee suggests Diaspora Judaism falls somewhere between Middle Platonism and Middle Stoicism (about where he places Epicureanism, p. 522). Diaspora Judaism has a wider range than the other philosophical schools; we must await the next volume for the details.

The first two chapters of the book introduce methodology and the components of moral transformation. With this background in mind, Lee introduces “the Body-Beating Platonist” (part 2) and the “Superhumans Stoic” (part 3). Part three includes two chapters on neo-Stoics, a chapter on the Stoic self and a chapter on the Stoic god. The final section is a retrospect of the argument of the book and a prospect for further study.

The book includes with two appendices which are absolutely critical for the philosophy specialist to read before moving into the body of the monograph. The first appendix surveys the main sources for Middle Platonism; the second the main sources for Early, Middle and Late Stoicism. Since most of this literature is not well-known to New Testament scholars, these two appendices will help navigate the massive data contained in this book.

For Lee, the main value of this study is the demonstration of Paul’s method of engaging the pluralism of his day. However, this theological payoff is only hinted in the book. Setting aside his discussion of Enberg-Pedersen’s Paul and the Stoics (pp. 25-27), there are only fourteen references in Paul’s letters in the index (there are twenty-seven to Philippians on those pages alone). This is not a criticism; the book is an in-depth study of Greco-Roman philosophical thinking on moral transformation rather than on Paul’s use (or non-use) of this material.

Paul established a precedence for patristic figures in the second century as the apologists began to engage the philosophical world with the claims of the Gospel.  Paul’s strategy has great potential for how the church in our day can engage a complex pluralistic world with diverse ideas which challenge the gospel (p. 529). This “encyclopedia of knowledge” sets the stage for examining Paul’s appropriation of the language of philosophical discourse to exhort this Gentile churches.

I look forward to further work in this important monograph. Be sure to request your university or seminary library obtain a copy!

Max Lee blogs at Paul ReDux and is active on twitter as @ProfMaxLee.  Nijay Gupta interviewed Lee about the release of this book.

NB: Thanks to Mohr Siebeck for kindly providing me with a review copy of this book. This did not influence my thoughts regarding the work.

Book Notice: Aaron W. White, The Prophets Agree: The Function of the Book of the Twelve Prophets in Acts

Aaron White The Prophets AgreeHere is a new book that combines two of my interests, the book of Acts and the use of Scripture in the New Testament: Aaron W. White, The Prophets Agree: The Function of the Book of the Twelve Prophets in Acts (Biblical Interpretation Series 184; Brill, 2020). White completed his PhD at Bristol University under the supervision of John Nolland. He currently serves as pastor of First Presbyterian Church in South Charleston, Ohio.

White has previously published an article on this issue, “‘The Creative Use of Amos by the Author of Acts’ Reexamined: The Lukan Appropriation of LXX-Amos in Acts and What it Tells Us About Luke,” Biblical Theology Bulletin 46.2 (2016).

The title of the book alludes to James’ enigmatic used of Amos 9 at the Jerusalem Council (Acts 15:15-17), although Acts 15 is only one of the four quotations from the Minor Prophets in Acts. He devotes a chapter to each citation:

  • “I Will Pour out My Spirit”: Jesus the Lord and the Lukan Reading of LXX-Joel 3:1–5 in Acts 2
  • “Forty Years”: The Divided People of God and the Lukan Reading of LXX-Amos 5:25–27 in Acts 7:42–43
  • “I Am Doing a Work”: The Gentiles as God’s People and the Lukan Reading of LXX-Habakkuk 1:5 in Acts 13
  • “All the Gentiles Who Are Called”: Sending the Gentile Mission and the Lukan Reading of LXX-Amos 9:11–12 in Acts 15

White compares Luke’s use of the minor prophet to an example from Second Temple Period literature. For example, Testament of Judah 24 alludes to Joel 3:1–5 in a messianic context. The Damascus Document: CD-A 7:13–8:1 alludes to Amos 5:25–27. For Habakkuk 1:5 in Acts 13, White 1.16–2.10 examines 1QpHab 1.16–2.10. For the perplexing use of Amos 9:11, White turns to 4Q Florilegium.

The book argues for the importance of reading the Twelve Prophets in unity when it is quoted in Acts and the integral role these citations play in the redemptive-historical plotline of Acts. White focuses on the place of the Minor Prophets in Acts asks what difference it makes to regard these four quotations as a singular contribution to Acts from a unified source.

I look forward to reading this book.

Great Deals on Kregel Academic from Logos Bible Software

Kregel Sale Logos Bible Software

Logos Bible Software posted  a collection of Kregel and Kregel Academic books with deep discounts.  Here are a few of the Academic highlights with links to my reviews:

The Kregel Exegetical Commentary series are 50% off:

Volumes of the Kregel Exegetical Handbooks are 50% to 66% off ($9.99 each):

There are several other Kregel Academic books I have reviewed on sale:

There are many, many more books in this sale, such as John Philips Exploring series (all volumes are $9.99 each). There are dozens of theology and practical theology books on sale as well.  So go to the sale page, browse the titles and fill that shopping cart up.

You need to have Logos Bible Software to use these resources.  As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals. Use the coupon code PARTNEROFFER8 to save 30% on base packages. You can also read these books via the free iOS app.

40 Questions Series for Logos Bible Software

Logos often runs pre-publication sales on books. This helps them gauge interest and offers the user a bit of a discount.When they gather enough interest, they put the books into production and the user is charged when the resources ship. They give you a heads-up email before you are charged, and the day they are released they are added to your library.

In this case, they are offering four recent additions to Kregel’s 40 Questions series for 25% off. Click the title to read my review of three of the four volumes in this pre-pub collection.

So that $60 for just under 1500 pages of Q&A on these important topics. The price goes up when the books are released, so act soon if you want these resources for your Logos library.

Here are a few more deals from Logos Bible Software and Eerdmans books that expire at the end of May:

You need to have Logos Bible Software to use these resources.  As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals. Use the coupon code PARTNEROFFER8 to save on base packages. You can also read these books via the free iOS app. The free (or almost free) from Eerdmans end on May 31, 2020.

Logos Free Book of the Month for May 2020 – Eerdmans Critical Commentary on Isaiah 40-66

Shalom Paul Isaiah commentaryThe Logos Free Book of the Month promotion offers a heavyweight commentary from Eerdmans. For the month of May, you can add Shalom Paul’s commentary on Isaiah 40–66 in the Eerdmans Critical Commentary. Paul is the Yehezkel Kaufman Professor Emeritus of Bible at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and chair of the Dead Sea Scrolls Foundation.  The commentary won the Biblical Archaeology Society Publication Award for Best Book Relating to the Hebrew Bible in 2013.

Shalom Paul’s comprehensive, all-inclusive study of the oracles of an anonymous prophet known only as Second Isaiah who prophesied in the second half of the sixth century B.C.E. Paul examines Isaiah 40–66 through a close reading of the biblical text, offering thorough exegesis of the historical, linguistic, literary, and theological aspects of the prophet’s writings. He also looks carefully at intertextual influences of earlier biblical and extrabiblical books, draws on the contributions of medieval Jewish commentators, and supports the contention that Second Isaiah should include chapters 55–66, thus eliminating the need to demarcate a Third Isaiah.

Check out this excerpt from the book on EerdWorld.

In addition to this Isaiah 40-66 commentary, you can add Thomas B. Dozeman’s Exodus commentary in the same Eerdmans Critical Commentary for an additional $5.99.  A review in the Journal of Theological Studies said “The sheer amount of information given in the commentary is amazing, and any reader who already has some competence in the subject will feel indebted to Dozeman for spreading such a varied buffet to select from.” This commentary is nearly 900 pages on Exodus, presenting “a fresh translation of the Hebrew text of Exodus along with a careful interpretation of its central themes, literary structure, and history of composition. He explores two related themes in the formation of the book of Exodus: the identity of Yahweh, the God of Israel, and the authority of Moses, the leader of the Israelite people.”

Floyd Minor ProphetsFor $2.99, you can add Michael Floyd’s Minor Prophets, Part 2 in the Forms of the Old Testament Literature Series. If you scroll all the way down the page, Logos has Antony Campbell’s volume on 1 Samuel in this series for $8.99. The FOTL series “presents a form-critical analysis of the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) based on a standard outline and methodology” including structure, genre, setting, and intention of the biblical literature in question. Religious Studies Review considered Floyd’s volume “one of the finest volumes in the FOTL series and is a must buy for anyone doing serious form-critical work in the books Nahum through Malachi.”

You can pick up the entire Forms of Old Testament Literature series for Logos as well.

So for about $18 you can get three major scholar works on the Old Testament, with a retail price of nearly $200.

The Logos giveaway for the month of May is excellent: enter to win a full set of Theological Dictionary of the Old Testament and New Testament, 26 volumes with a retail value of $799! The TDNT is dated, but is still a standard resource for New Testament studies. The TDOT is the best theological lexicon on for Hebrew available, the final volumes were only published 2019. Enter early and enter often to win this major academic resource.

You need to have Logos Bible Software to use these resources.  As always, there are less expensive paths to upgrading that will keep you from mortgaging your home. At the very least, download the free Logos Basic or the $79 Logos 8 Fundamentals. Use the coupon code PARTNEROFFER8 to save 30% on base packages. You can also read these books via the free iOS app.

These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through May 31, 2020.

More Free Books for Logos Bible Software – Joseph Blenkinsopp

In addition to the regular Free Book promotion from Logos (this month it is a one-hour Mobile Course on Faith Working Through Love by N. T. Wright), Logos has added a second promotion featuring Joseph Blenkinsopp. He is Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana and has written major commentaries on Isaiah 1-39, 4-55, and 56-66 in the Anchor Bible Commentary, Ezra-Nehemiah in the OTL (as well as Judaism, the First Phase: The Place of Ezra and Nehemiah in the Origins of Judaism, Eerdmans 2009), and Opening the Sealed Book: Interpretations of the Book of Isaiah in Late Antiquity (Eerdmans, 2006). His History of Prophecy in Israel (WJKP 1996) is a classic textbook. He has published shorter books on Abraham: The Story of a Life (Eerdmans 2015) and David Remembered: Kingship and National Identity in Ancient Israel (Eerdmans 2013).

For the next month, you can add Blenkinsopp’s Creation, Un-creation, Re-creation: A Discursive Commentary on Genesis 1-11 (T&T Clark 2011) to your Logos Library for free. This is a commentary on Genesis 1-11 arguing “from biblical point of view, creation cannot be restricted to a single event, nor to two versions of an event (as depicted in Genesis 1-3) but, rather, must take in the whole period of creation arranged in the sequence: creation – uncreation – recreation (as can be derived from Genesis 1-11).”

For $2.99 add Blenkinsopp’s Interpretation commentary on Ezekiel (WJKP, 2012). Although not everyone appreciates the Interpretation series, the brevity of the commentary make for a quite read (and the price is right!)

For an additional $4.99 add his Wisdom and Law in the Old Testament: The Ordering of Life in Israel and Early Judaism (Oxford University Press, 1995). This might be the real gem of Logos’s promotion since the book is difficult to find inexpensively in print.

Scroll all the way to the bottom and add his Ezra-Nehemiah commentary for $6.99

So for the next thirty days, you can pick up three excellent, scholarly resources for your Logos library for less than $15.

If you are looking for a good way to spent your stimulus check and do not have Logos Bible Software yet, download the free Logos Basic or Logos 8 Fundamentals for only $99. With either minimal package you can download and use these sale books as well as the Logos free book every month.

 

Logos Free Book of the Month for March 2020 – Lexham Research Commentary: Genesis 1-11

For the month of March Logos is giving away the Lexham Research Commentary on Genesis 1-11 (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012). What is a “research commentary”? This resource is edited by Miles Custis, Douglas Mangum, and Wendy Widder as a way of bringing all the resources of the Logos Library into a commentary-like format. The guides are a research tool presenting a wide range of interpretive issues raised by Bible scholars. The idea of these Research Commentaries is similar To Allan Ross’s Creation and Blessing, a commentary on Genesis which often pointed out what a pastor or teacher needs to sort out before actually teaching the text.

The editors of the series explain in the preface to the Genesis 1-11 volume:

Each volume in the series links to standard scholarly works on the Bible. The authors of the Lexham Research Commentaries have made no attempt to identify where particular interpretations fall along the theological or denominational spectrum. This is a mark of the diversity of biblical interpretation, not a mark of implicit endorsement by the guides’ authors. Interpreters from different theological perspectives often have conflicting views on the same texts. As you encounter these views, we urge you to keep the biblical text itself central to your study.

How does this differ from running the Logos Bible Study or Word Study tools? The topics and resources are curated and annotated by the editors of the volume. After an introduction to the section of Genesis, the editors select a series of issues every interpret must struggle with and come to some conclusion in their teaching. For Genesis 1, the issues include

  • The Genre of Genesis 1
  • Worldview of Genesis
  • Days of Creation
  • Culture Wars over Creation
  • Creation from Nothing
  • The Image of God
  • The Sabbath
  • Key Word Study: Bereshith, “In the Beginning”
  • Key Word Study: Tohu wabohu, “Formless and Void”
  • Background Studies: Ancient Near Eastern Creation Stories

Just one or two examples: For the Image of God, after a short paragraph describing what the problem is and offering several options, there are links to the article “Image of God” in the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch, a link to Claus Westermann, Continental Commentary Series commentary Genesis 1–11, specifically his “Excursus: The History of the Exegesis of Genesis 1:26–27.” and Gordon Wenham’s discussion of “‘Image’ and ‘Likeness’ ” in his Word Biblical Commentary on Genesis 1–15. On the word Bereshith, there are links to Kenneth Mathews, Excursus on translating 1:1–2 in his New American Commentary on Genesis 1–11:26, Victor Hamilton;s New International Commentary on the Old Testament on Genesis 1–17, and Wenham’s Word commentary. These linked resources are often Bible Dictionaries or theological lexicons.

For more controversial topics, such as the Days of Creation, the editors offer more annotations. Here are the six resources suggested by the Lexham Research Commentary:

  • Robert Gurney offers a defense of the young earth creationist interpretation, taking the days of creation as six literal 24-hour days. “Does It Matter?” Six Day Creation: Does It Matter What You Believe?
  • Victor Hamilton’s commentary carefully explains the three major interpretive options: the literal 24-hour day, the day-age theory, and the literary framework theory. Hamilton’s preference is a literary reading of Gen 1 with an analogical understanding of the days of creation. “The ‘Days’ of Genesis 1” The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: The Book of Genesis, Chapters 1–17
  • R. Kent Hughes lists six different possible interpretations of the days of creation. He admits only one can be correct but cautions against letting the issue become a point of division among believers. He argues for the analogical view—that the days are God’s workdays, which are analogous with earth days but not necessarily the same as literal 24-hour days. “Genesis 1:3–13” Preaching the Word: Genesis—Beginning and Blessing
  • John Lennox has an old earth creationist perspective but discusses the options for understanding the days of creation as literal 24-hour days, as undefined lengths of time (day-age), or as a literary framework. His conclusion is a form of the punctuated activity view, in which long spans of time separate the literal 24-hour days of creation. “But Is It Old? The Days of Creation” Seven Days that Divide the World: The Beginning according to Genesis and Science
  • Hugh Ross believes in an old earth and that “days” represent ages or epochs of time. He explains how this view is not incompatible with Genesis. “Introduction: The Dawn of a New Day” A Matter of Days: Resolving a Creation Controversy
  • John Walton accepts that the days of creation could be 24-hour days, but he argues that God is creating functions not matter during the week of creation. By the end of the week, He takes up residence in His cosmic temple. “Gen 1:1–31” The NIV Application Commentary: Genesis

Each unit is introduced with a comment on the structure (an outline), the place of the section in the book of Genesis and the place in the canon, and a very helpful “starting point.” This last item is a way to introduce the key issues for understanding the section.

All of the links in this resource are marked with either an open book or a padlock. Open books mean you have purchased the linked resource, locks mean you have not. This is my main criticism of the Lexham Research Commentaries: they are essentially guides to helping you spend more money in the Logos store. If you only have a few resources in your library, then the links will all be locked. People with larger libraries will find these resources more useful. I also wonder if the editors were limited in their resource annotations to only resources licensed through the Logos library? Are there are other articles, books and commentaries which would have been very helpful for the issue at hand which were omitted simply because Logos does not sell it?

Nevertheless, the commentary is provided in the Genesis 1-15 volume is in fact a good introduction to controversial topics and interpretive conundrums and the resources provided are available in any Christian University or Seminary library.

You can add the Jonah commentary for $4,99 and the First Peter commentary for another $9.99. As is often the case, Logos is running a giveaway with several ways to enter to win all 20 volumes of the Lexham Research Commentaries.

These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through March 31, 2020.