Logos Free Book of the Month for March 2020 – Lexham Research Commentary: Genesis 1-11

For the month of March Logos is giving away the Lexham Research Commentary on Genesis 1-11 (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012). What is a “research commentary”? This resource is edited by Miles Custis, Douglas Mangum, and Wendy Widder as a way of bringing all the resources of the Logos Library into a commentary-like format. The guides are a research tool presenting a wide range of interpretive issues raised by Bible scholars. The idea of these Research Commentaries is similar To Allan Ross’s Creation and Blessing, a commentary on Genesis which often pointed out what a pastor or teacher needs to sort out before actually teaching the text.

The editors of the series explain in the preface to the Genesis 1-11 volume:

Each volume in the series links to standard scholarly works on the Bible. The authors of the Lexham Research Commentaries have made no attempt to identify where particular interpretations fall along the theological or denominational spectrum. This is a mark of the diversity of biblical interpretation, not a mark of implicit endorsement by the guides’ authors. Interpreters from different theological perspectives often have conflicting views on the same texts. As you encounter these views, we urge you to keep the biblical text itself central to your study.

How does this differ from running the Logos Bible Study or Word Study tools? The topics and resources are curated and annotated by the editors of the volume. After an introduction to the section of Genesis, the editors select a series of issues every interpret must struggle with and come to some conclusion in their teaching. For Genesis 1, the issues include

  • The Genre of Genesis 1
  • Worldview of Genesis
  • Days of Creation
  • Culture Wars over Creation
  • Creation from Nothing
  • The Image of God
  • The Sabbath
  • Key Word Study: Bereshith, “In the Beginning”
  • Key Word Study: Tohu wabohu, “Formless and Void”
  • Background Studies: Ancient Near Eastern Creation Stories

Just one or two examples: For the Image of God, after a short paragraph describing what the problem is and offering several options, there are links to the article “Image of God” in the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch, a link to Claus Westermann, Continental Commentary Series commentary Genesis 1–11, specifically his “Excursus: The History of the Exegesis of Genesis 1:26–27.” and Gordon Wenham’s discussion of “‘Image’ and ‘Likeness’ ” in his Word Biblical Commentary on Genesis 1–15. On the word Bereshith, there are links to Kenneth Mathews, Excursus on translating 1:1–2 in his New American Commentary on Genesis 1–11:26, Victor Hamilton;s New International Commentary on the Old Testament on Genesis 1–17, and Wenham’s Word commentary. These linked resources are often Bible Dictionaries or theological lexicons.

For more controversial topics, such as the Days of Creation, the editors offer more annotations. Here are the six resources suggested by the Lexham Research Commentary:

  • Robert Gurney offers a defense of the young earth creationist interpretation, taking the days of creation as six literal 24-hour days. “Does It Matter?” Six Day Creation: Does It Matter What You Believe?
  • Victor Hamilton’s commentary carefully explains the three major interpretive options: the literal 24-hour day, the day-age theory, and the literary framework theory. Hamilton’s preference is a literary reading of Gen 1 with an analogical understanding of the days of creation. “The ‘Days’ of Genesis 1” The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: The Book of Genesis, Chapters 1–17
  • R. Kent Hughes lists six different possible interpretations of the days of creation. He admits only one can be correct but cautions against letting the issue become a point of division among believers. He argues for the analogical view—that the days are God’s workdays, which are analogous with earth days but not necessarily the same as literal 24-hour days. “Genesis 1:3–13” Preaching the Word: Genesis—Beginning and Blessing
  • John Lennox has an old earth creationist perspective but discusses the options for understanding the days of creation as literal 24-hour days, as undefined lengths of time (day-age), or as a literary framework. His conclusion is a form of the punctuated activity view, in which long spans of time separate the literal 24-hour days of creation. “But Is It Old? The Days of Creation” Seven Days that Divide the World: The Beginning according to Genesis and Science
  • Hugh Ross believes in an old earth and that “days” represent ages or epochs of time. He explains how this view is not incompatible with Genesis. “Introduction: The Dawn of a New Day” A Matter of Days: Resolving a Creation Controversy
  • John Walton accepts that the days of creation could be 24-hour days, but he argues that God is creating functions not matter during the week of creation. By the end of the week, He takes up residence in His cosmic temple. “Gen 1:1–31” The NIV Application Commentary: Genesis

Each unit is introduced with a comment on the structure (an outline), the place of the section in the book of Genesis and the place in the canon, and a very helpful “starting point.” This last item is a way to introduce the key issues for understanding the section.

All of the links in this resource are marked with either an open book or a padlock. Open books mean you have purchased the linked resource, locks mean you have not. This is my main criticism of the Lexham Research Commentaries: they are essentially guides to helping you spend more money in the Logos store. If you only have a few resources in your library, then the links will all be locked. People with larger libraries will find these resources more useful. I also wonder if the editors were limited in their resource annotations to only resources licensed through the Logos library? Are there are other articles, books and commentaries which would have been very helpful for the issue at hand which were omitted simply because Logos does not sell it?

Nevertheless, the commentary is provided in the Genesis 1-15 volume is in fact a good introduction to controversial topics and interpretive conundrums and the resources provided are available in any Christian University or Seminary library.

You can add the Jonah commentary for $4,99 and the First Peter commentary for another $9.99. As is often the case, Logos is running a giveaway with several ways to enter to win all 20 volumes of the Lexham Research Commentaries.

These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through March 31, 2020.

All NICOT and NICNT Commentaries only $19.95 for Logos Bible Software

NICNT Commentary Logos is running a great sale on the New International Commentary series published by Eerdmans This All volumes in this long-running series, both Old and New Testament are only $19.95 each.By far the best deal in this sale is Doug Moo’s Romans Commentary (Second Edition). The hardback print version of this 2018 commentary is $79.95 retail, so an electronic copy for $19.95 is hard to pass up. David Toshio Tsumura’s two volumes on First and Second Samuel are excellent, all four of the Gospels volumes are standard reference commentaries (R. T. France on Matthew, Joel Green on Luke, and Ramsey Michaels on John).

Like most commentary series, the NICOT and NICNT have replaced a number of volumes over the years. Sometimes the older commentary is more brief, primarily since commentaries have grown thicker in recent years (yes, I am looking at you, Craig Keener). Not all the older volumes of this series are available in Logos format, but a few are. Some readers may prefer a classic commentary by F. F. Bruce. I notice the original John volume by Leon Morris is still available. For some reason both the first and second edition of Fee’s commentary on 1 Corinthians is for sale, I so not see much reason to buy the first edition. Ronald Fung’s excellent commentary on Galatians is still available although it was replaced by deSilva, F. F. Bruce on Colossians Philemon and Ephesians is still for sale even though Scot McKnight has an updated volume on Colossians and Philemon. The same is true for Bruce’s Hebrews commentary, it has now been replaced by Gareth Lee Cockrill’s 2012 commentary. James Adamson’s 1976 James commentary has been replaced by Scot McKnight in 2011.

For more recent volumes, have reviewed several of NICNT commentaries, so click through to the full reviews on these volumes.

If you do not have Logos Bible Software download the free Logos Basic or Logos 8 Fundamentals for only $99. With either minimal package you can download and use these sale books as well as the Logos free book every month.

I do not see an expiration date for this sale, but I cannot imagine it will last long. Head to the Sale page and load up on excellent professional commentaries for your Logos library.

 

Logos Commentary Flash Sale

Logos is running a “flash sale” on a fine collection great commentaries starting January 28 (10AM PST) through January 31 (10AM PST). They call this a New Testament Technical Commentary Collection: seventeen professional commentaries on the Gospels and Acts from various series. These are all highly rated commentaries in professional, academic series, most of them are on my Top Five commentary lists for Matthew, Mark, Luke, John and Acts.

Normally these commentaries would cost as much as $630.99, but during the sale, the collection is 40% off, $378.59. If you already own any of these resources, Logos will give you a “dynamic price,” which is their fancy way of saying they will not charge you twice. These are all highly respected volumes and rarely turn up in the used book stores, and if they do, they are usually very expensive in print. Many of these commentaries are not usually available on sale, so this 40% off bundle is a good opportunity to add resources to your Logos Library.

Logos Gospel-Acts Flash Sale

I always prefer a real book to a Logos book, but there are some advantages to purchasing a Logos version of these commentaries. You have all of the resources of Logos Bible Software available to you as you read. For example, hover over an abbreviation to see what it means. You can hover over a Scripture reference to see the verse and click the reference to open the verse in your preferred Bible. When you click on Greek or Hebrew words Logos opens your preferred lexicon. Right click over a highlight word to open a Bible Dictionary or other related resource. For example, you can open the Anchor Bible Dictionary and read the article on Capernaum. You could also search for all references to Capernaum in the commentary, in related books or in all the resources you own.

Use the Bible Word Study tool to create a page of resources on any person, place of thing mentioned in the commentary. I often use the search feature to find all the references to something in the commentary, such as a location or a particular scholar. This is something a physical book does in the indices, but the Logos search function finds everything even if it does not appear in the book’s index. For example, I used the search feature to find all of the references to participles in Nolland’s Matthew commentary.

The a New Testament Technical Commentary Collection includes:

In The New International Greek Testament Commentary published by Eerdmans the collection includes Matthew by John Nolland (2005), Mark by R. T. France, Luke by I. Howard Marshall. The NIGTC Series is perhaps one of the most respected technical commentaries and well worth the price.

In the International Critical Commentary (T&T Clark) the bundle includes all three volumes on Matthew by W. D. Davies and Dale C. Allison Jr. (1988, 1991) and both volumes of C. K. Barrett’s Acts commentary (1994, 1998). T&T Clark published a paperback copy of these volumes, retailing for $60+ each, the hardbacks are mostly unavailable and are cost prohibitive for most readers.

In the Yale Anchor Bible Commentary, both volumes of Joseph A. Fitzmyer’s commentary on Luke (1981) and Raymond Brown’s commentary on John (1966). Both of these are constantly cited in newer commentaries.

In the New Testament Library (Westminster John Knox) the bundle includes Eugene Boring on Mark (2006) and J. Louis Martyn, History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel (2004)

The collection includes three now classic commentaries, Robert H. Gundry, Mark: A Commentary on His Apology for the Cross (Eerdmans, 1993, reprinted in two volumes in 2000), D. A. Carson’s Pillar commentary on John (Eerdmans, 1991), and F. F. Bruce’s classic commentary on The Book of the Acts in the New International Commentary on the New Testament (Eerdmans, revised edition 1988).

This flash sale ends January 31, 2020 at 10AM PST, so click the links and head over to Logos and see if this Technical Commentary Bundle is right for you.

Sale on Pauline Studies from Wipf & Stock (Kindle Books)

Wipf and Stock Kindle Deals

Wipf & Stock has some great deals on Kindle versions of a few books on Paul. I would highly recommend Beyond Old and New Perspectives on Paul and Reading Paul within Judaism if you do not already have them. I usually prefer physical books, but for $2.99 each the Kindle version is fine. These deals run through 1/24/2020 so grab them fast.

Although not part of this deal, you should also check out my book, Galatians: Freedom through God’s Grace. It $9.99 for Kindle, feel free to grab three or four physical copies for all your friends.

Logos Bible Software Deals for December 2019

Logos is running their annual Christmas sale on base packages. Until the end of the year you can save 20% on one of their Logos 8 base packages, from the affordable Fundementals package (only $79.95) the pricier packages like Silver, Gold, or Gold-pressed Latinum versions. Now is time to upgrade to Logos 8 (which is a year old now…check out my review of the new version). If you do not have Logos yet, you should at least get the free basic version so you can take advantage of the free book of the month and the other sale resources. Use the coupon code READINGACTS8 at checkout and save a bit of money.

Every month Logos Bible Software gives away a free book for your Logos library, along with a few deeply discounted books in the same series or from the same publisher. This month features the Brazos Theological commentary series published by Baker.  You can add Jaroslav Pelikan’s Acts commentary for free, Stanley Hauerwas on Matthew for $4.99 and Peter J. Leithart on 1-2 Kings for $9.99. The three books retail for just under $90, so $15 for the three is a great deal.

When the Brazos Commentary first appeared I was surprised by the authors. Stanley Hauerwas is excellent, but he is not my first thought for a commentary on Matthew. What kind of commentary would a theologian like Hauerwas write? The book blurb for this volume is an attempt to answer my  suspicions:

Stanley Hauerwas’ commentary on Matthew is not your typical commentary. Though most commentators approach a book for its theological aspects, Hauerwas’ Matthew focuses on the “how-to” of becoming a disciple of Jesus Christ. With the use of current Matthean scholarship and the wisdom of various scholars and theologians, including Augustine, Barth, and Bonhoeffer, Hauerwas is able to address relevant topics like homosexuality, politics, and abortion—not normally discussed in other commentaries on Matthew.

The same would be true for Jaroslav Pelikan. (Here is the a lengthy review via Best Commentaries)

Jaroslav Pelikan, one of the most well-respected scholars in the history of Christianity, brings you an insightful and well articulated commentary on Acts. This distinctly theological commentary focuses more on the themes and dogmas of Acts, rather than the text itself.

All three are excellent resources even if they are not the same kind of commentary as the New International Greek Text Commentary (last month’s giveaway).These valuable resources are only free (or almost free) through December 31, 2019.

Logos also does an Author’s Spotlight each month, for December they focus on the work of Craig Evans. You can save 25% or more on almost everything in the Logos Library with a contribution from Evans. Craig Evans is John Bisagno Distinguished Professor of Christian Origins at Houston Baptist University and formerly the Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament and director of the graduate program at Acadia Divinity College in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. He has written more than 70 books and hundreds of journal articles. Logos featured Evans in quite a few of their Mobile Course (most are 35% off).

Logos has some of his popular books on the list as well as his Word Biblical Commentary on Mark 8:27–16:20. He is a contributor to the new volume on the historical Jesus from Zondervan, Jesus, Skepticism, and the Problem of History: Criteria and Context in the Study of Christian Origins (25% off). Two other excellent academic books on the list are two edited volumes in the LNTS series from Blombury T&T Clark on intertextuality in the New Testament, ‘What Does the Scripture Say?’ Studies in the Function of Scripture in Early Judaism and Christianity, Volume 1: The Synoptic Gospels and Volume 2: The Letters and Liturgical Traditions ($17.99 each).

Looks like a great time to add some excellent resources to your Logos library!

 

More Free Historic Commentaries from Logos

In addition to the regular free book of the month (Jaroslav Pelikan’s Acts commentary in the Brazos Theological commentary series) Logos is offering three historic commentaries on Matthew. For free, you can add Thomas Aquinas, Catena Aurea: Commentary on the Four Gospels, Collected out of the Works of the Fathers, Volume 1: St. Matthew (J. H. Parker, 1841). This is only the first volume of the eight volume set, available here for $24.95 (although you might have additional discounts available). Hint: Get the free volume before buying the set.

Also on offer is Jerome’s commentary on Matthew in the Fathers of the Church Patristic Series by Catholic University Press. The paperback of this volume is $45 on Amazon; Logos has it for $7.99 through the end of December. Back in July Logos offered three other volumes of this massive series as their free/cheap book of the month.

For $8.99 you can add Hilary of Poitiers, Commentary on Matthew in the same series. This 2012 translation by D. H. Williams is the first time the commentary has appeared in English.

Both volumes are part of the Latin Fathers of the Nicene Era (25 vols.) collection. Be sure to take the free volume before buying the full set.

Don’t forget Logos has a nice collection of resources on sale through the end of the month on a “secret” sale.  If you do not have Logos yet,  get the free basic version so you can take advantage of these free (or cheap) books of the month or the other sale resources. Use the coupon code READINGACTS8 at checkout and save a bit of money.

The Secret Logos Christmas Sale

Logos has a nice collection of resources on sale through the end of the month on a “secret” sale. Since I am unveiling this musterion to you, let me highlight some of the better deals. There is plenty on this list for everyone, some theology, some pastoral resources, some church history, and even a few Mobile Ed course. Follow the link and poke around, maybe you can find something to stuff your own stocking with.

  • Craig Keener’s Mobile Ed course, Introductory Issues in Acts (35% off)
  • N. T. Wright’s Christian Origins and the Question of God Series (four volumes, 30% off) and his Pauline Perspectives: Essays on Paul (30% off).
  • James Dunn SCM collection, three volumes at 30% off. This includes his classic Baptism in the Holy Spirit: A Re-Examination of the New Testament Teaching on the Gift of the Spirit in Relation to Pentecostalism TodayUnity and Diversity in the New Testament: An Inquiry into the Character of Earliest Christianity, and The Parting of the Ways.
  • The LNTS volumes on The Old Testament in Revelation are 40% off ($22.18 for both volumes). This is a great deal on G.K. Beale’s John’s Use of the Old Testament in Revelation (2015) and and Steve Moyise’s The Old Testament in the Book of Revelation (2014).  The Library of New Testament Studies are usually pricey, so this is the real bargain in this sale.

Do not forget about the Free book of the month, Jaroslav Pelikan’s Acts commentary in the Brazos Theological commentary series. The Matthew and 1-2 Kings commentaries are also available on that page at a deep discount.

If you do not have Logos yet, you should at least get the free basic version so you can take advantage of the free book of the month and the other sale resources. Maybe it is time to get a base package or upgrade to Logos 8 (which is a year old now…check out my review of the new version). All based packages are on sale for 20% off for the month of December. This includes the affordable Fundementals package (only $79.95) the pricier packages like Silver, Gold, or Gold-pressed Latinum versions. Use the coupon code READINGACTS8 at checkout and save a bit of money.