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romans-debateIt is time to draw a name for The Romans Debate, Revised and Expanded Edition (1991, Baker Academic). This book is a brand new paperback (with a remainder mark) and is my own copy.

There were 24 people signed up (I allowed only one entry per person). I took each of your names, sorted randomly and then pasted them into Excel. Random.org gave me a number between 1-28, and the winner is…..

Rubén de Rus

Congratulations to Rubén, better luck next time for the rest of you. Rubén should contact me privately with his shipping info, I will get the book out tomorrow.

I at least one more book to give away, so look for another post later today.

 

 

 

romans-debateThis week I am giving away a copy of The Romans Debate, Revised and Expanded Edition (1991, Baker Academic). This collection of essays on Romans was first published in 1977 and then reprinted and expanded in 1991 by Hendricksen. The current printing of the book is under from Baker Academic. This is one of the best resources for anyone doing serious work in Romans.  The book collects key essays in the book of Romans from as early as 1962. All of the essays were published elsewhere, but this 372 page volume makes them available with a full set of indices.

This book is a brand new paperback (with a remainder mark) and is my own copy.

Same rules as last week: Enter by leaving a comment telling me which essay you will read first. On Tuesday January 16 I will randomly select one comment and ship the book out to the lucky winner. If you leave more than one comment, I will only count one comment per person for the contest.

Good Luck!

 

Table of Contents:

  • St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans–and Others, T. W. Manson
  • The Letter to the Romans as Paul’s Last Will and Testament, Gunther Bornkamm
  • Paul’s Purpose in Writing the Epistle to the Romans, Gunter Klein
  • A Short Note on Romans 16, Karl Paul Donfried
  • The Letter to Jerusalem, Jacob Jervell
  • Romans 14:1-15:13 and the Occasion of Romans, Robert J. Karris
  • The Jewish Community in Ancient Rome and the Origins of Roman Christianity, Wolfgang Wiefel
  • False Presuppositions in the Study of Romans, Karl Paul Donfried
  • The Occasion of Romans: A Response to Prof. Donfried, Robert J. Karris
  • Paul’s Rhetoric of Argumentation in Romans: An Alternative to the Donfried-Karris Debate Over Romans, Wilhelm Wuellner
  • The Form and Function of the Greek Letter-Essay, Martin Luther Stirewalt, Jr.

Part II
Section A: Historical and Sociological Factors

  • The Romans Debate, F. F. Bruce
  • Purpose and Occasion of Romans Again, A. J. M. Wedderburn
  • The Two Roman Congregations: Romans 14:1-15:13, Francis Watson
  • The Roman Christians of Romans 16, Peter Lampe
  • The Purpose of Romans, Peter Stuhlmacher

Section B The Structure and Rhetoric of Romans

  • The Formal and Theological Coherence of Romans, James D. G. Dunn
  • Romans III as a Key to the Structure and Thought of Romans, William S. Campbell
  • Following the Argument of Romans, Robert Jewett
  • Romans as a Logos Protreptikos, David E. Aune

Section C The Theology of Romans: Issues in the Current Debate

  • The New Perspective on Paul: Paul and the Law, James D. G. Dunn
  • Israel’s Misstep in the Eyes of Paul, Lloyd Gaston
  • The Faithfulness of God and the Priority of Israel in Paul’s Letter to the Romans, J. C. Beker
  • The Theme of Romans, Peter Stuhlmacher

 

Zondervan is offering the 42 volumes of the NIV Application commentary for $4.99 each for a limited time. Starting on November 7, you can purchase any volume of this series in an eBook format for only $4.99.

nivac_banner

This series features the work of many world-class scholars who have contributed major commentaries on a book. For example, Douglas Moo, who wrote a major commentary in the NICNT series, contributes the NIVAC volume on Romans. It is possible many busy pastors and teachers who do not have the time to wade through all of the exegetical intricacies of Moo’s 1000+ page commentary on Romans will find his comments on Romans in this series more accessible.Image result for NIVAC genesis

Each section of the commentary begins with as section entitled “original meaning.” Here the author provides a narrative commentary on the text. In most cases the commentary reflects the author’s work in the original although there is little reference to Hebrew or Greek. I would characterize this as an exposition of the text rather than exegesis.

After the exposition, the commentary has a short section entitled “bridging contexts.” Since the world of the Bible is different than our world, the authors attempt to set scripture in context of the first century and then provide some analogy to a modern situation. In Scot McKnight’s commentary on Galatians, for example, he describes the challenge of the Judaizers to Paul’s ministry, then draws an analogy the challenge faced of strict fundamentalists today.

Image result for NIVAC galatiansFollowing this section, the author’s offer some application of the text to contemporary Christian life or church practice. This “contemporary significance” is often very personal, McKnight’s comments on fundamentalism are draw from his own experience. These sections will help a pastor or teacher apply the text, but will also be encouraging to general readers.

In fact, the NIV Application series is designed to be an accessible commentary for general readers. Any volume of the series would make a good companion volume to supplement a layperson’s reading of a biblical book. There are footnotes pointing to other literature for readers who want to read the technical, scholarly details and the bibliography will point readers to other more extensive commentaries.

Each commentary is only $4.99 in an eBook format (Amazon/Kindle, Barnes & Noble/Nook; CBD/eBooks; iTunes/iBooks). There are several bundles collecting several NIVAC volumes, starting at $17.99 (Pentateuch, Historical Books, Wisdom Books, Major Prophets, Minor Prophets, Gospels and Acts, Pauline Epistles, General Epistles and Revelation).

The sale ends on November 13, 2016 (Sunday) at 11:59pm ET.

Reading LukeTo celebrate the happiest time of the year (the beginning of school), I am going to give away a few books on Reading Acts. I gave Jake Bodet (@JakeBodet) a copy of The World of the New Testament: Cultural, Social, and Historical Contexts (Grand Rapids. Mich.: Baker Academic, 2013) edited by Joel B. Green and Lee Martin McDonald.

For this week’s giveaway, I have a copy of Reading Luke:Interpretation, Reflection, Formation edited by Craig Bartholomew, Joel B. Green, and Anthony C. Thiselton (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, 2005). This is the sixth volume coming from the Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar and contains essays Luke and Acts from a wide range of scholars. Graham Stanton said the essays “offer fresh perspectives, especially on issues of method and interpretation. The essays are accessible to a wide readership, yet they are full of insights which will stimulate further reflection and research.”

This book is a brand new hardback and is my own copy. The only caveat is that the book has a different slip jacket than the picture above. I think it is the Paternoster (British) printing rather than the North American Zondervan printing. I cannot see any other differences.  I bought the book not realizing I already had the Zondervan edition, so my bad memory is your gain.

Same rules as last week: Enter by leaving a comment telling me which essay you will read first. On Tuesday September 8 I will randomly select one comment and ship the book out to the lucky winner. If you leave more than one comment, I will only count one comment per person for the contest.

Good Luck!

 

Table of Contents:

INTRODUCTION
The Hermeneutical Dynamics of ‘Reading Luke’ as Interpretation, Reflection, and Formation.
Anthony C. Thiselton

NARRATIVE, HISTORY, AND THEOLOGY
Learning Theological Interpretation from Luke.
Joel B. Green

The Purpose of Luke-Acts: Israel’s Story in the Context of the Roman Empire.
David Wenham

Preparing the Way of the Lord: Introducing and Interpreting Luke’s Narrative: A Response to David Wenham.
F. Scott Spencer

Reading Luke’s Gospel as Ancient Hellenistic Narrative: Luke’s Narrative Plan of Israel’s Suffering Messiah as God’s Saving Plan for the World.
David P. Moessner

LANGUAGE, PARABLES, AND LEVELS AND WAYS OF READING LUKE

Political and Eschatological Language in Luke.
I. Howard Marshall

The Role of Money and Possessions in the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11–32): A Test Case.
John Nolland

Reading Luke, Hearing Jesus, Understanding God: Reflection on Hermeneutical Issues in Response to John Nolland.
Stephen I. Wright

A Critical Examination of David Bosch’s Missional Reading of Luke.
Michael W. Goheen.

DISTINCTIVE THEOLOGICAL THEMES IN LUKE-ACTS

Luke and the Spirit: Renewing Theological Interpretation of Biblical Pneumatology.
Max Turner

Kingdom and Church in Luke-Acts From Davidic Christology to Kingdom Ecclesiology.
Scott W. Hahn

A Canonical Approach to Interpreting Luke. The Journey Motif as a Hermeneutical Key.
Charles H. H. Scobie

Prayer in/and the Drama of Redemption in Luke: Prayer and Exegetical Performance.
Craig G. Bartholomew and Robby Holt

ISSUES IN RECEPTION HISTORY AND RECEPTION THEORY

The Reception and Use of the Gospel of Luke to the Second Century.
Francois Bovon.

Looking for Luke in the Second Century: A Dialogue with Francois Bovon
Andrew Gregory

Illuminating Luke: The Third Gospel as Italian Renaissance and Baroque Painting.
Heidi J. Hornik and Mikeal C. Parsons

Beale, Gregory K., Daniel J. Brendsel, and William A. Ross. An Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek: Analysis of Prepositions, Adverbs, Particles, Relative Pronouns, and Conjunctions. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, 2014. 96 p. Pb. $15.99. Link to Zondervan.

This short book combines a lexical analysis and exegetical syntax for the always troublesome “little words”: prepositions, adverbs, particles, relative pronouns and conjunctions. It joins Murray Harris’s Prepositions and Theology in the Greek New Testament (Zondervan, 2012) and Dan Wallace’s Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics (Zondervan, 1996) as a specialized tool for Greek exegesis focusing on logical relationships between propositions (p. 6).

Interpretive LexiconIn the introduction to the Interpretive Lexicon, the authors explain the need for a handy list of words that used in the Greek New Testament to indicate relationships between clauses. The book uses a series of abbreviations for the types of logical relationships possible. For example, Alt = Alternative, C-E = Cause and Effect, C?-E = Condition, T = Temporal, +/- = Negative-Positive, etc. The authors provide brief descriptions of these abbreviations and offer a short introduction on how to read the entries in the Lexicon.

The main purpose of the books is to help interpreters tease out the often subtle connections between phrases and clauses in order to shed light on the text. Because the book is a brief handbook, a student can quickly identify the types of logical relationships possible for any given preposition when working on a discourse analysis of a pericope.

The lexicon itself is only 69 pages. It includes mores prepositions, adverbs and particles, but it is not exhaustive. Each entry begins by providing the page numbers in either the second edition of Bauer (1979, BAGD) or the third edition (2000, BDAG). Entries also include page references to either Harris or Wallace. Each entry is subdivided into usage (preposition with the dative, adverb, etc.) and the entry is “tagged” with an abbreviation indicating the type of logical connection the word usually indicates. The word ἐκεῖ, for example, is an “adverb of place” in BDAG, the Interpretive Lexicon identifies it has an adverb, either L (location) or NLR (no logical relationship). Other entries are more complex, ἐν includes six logical relationships as well as references to Wallace and Harris, plus separate entries for ἐν τῷ + and infinitive and ἐν ᾧ.

There are other guides that are similar to this Lexicon, such Steven Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2010) or Harris’s text used throughout this Interpretive Lexicon. Runge is far more detailed, which is to be expected in a monograph that runs over 400 pages. This Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek is therefore a valuable exegetical aid for the student reading the Greek New Testament. Considering the book low price of the book, it is an affordable addition to any student’s Greek reading aides. It will in a valuable handbook for those working on a discourse analysis of a text.

NB: Thanks to Zondervan for kindly providing me with a review copy of this book. This did not influence my thoughts regarding the work.

 

 

 

ZECC ThessaloniansZondervan is giving away a copy of the ZECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians by Gary Shogren and all you have to do is tell them who the Restrainer in 2 Thessalonians 2 is by leaving a comment on the Koinonia site.

This brings to mind a great new way to solve theological debates.  Blogs can give away a prize to whoever can solve the Synoptic Problem or explain who those people were who were raised to life in Matthew 27:52-53.  We just need to find a prize big enough to bring in the heavyweights in to leave comments.

Anyway, Zondervan is kind enough to give away a copy of this fine commentary, leave a comment and / or retweet the page for a chance to win. Fortunately I posted by thoughts on this passage a few weeks ago, so Reading Acts subscribers have an inside track.

Tremper Longman, III. Introducing the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, 2012. 192 pages, pb. $14.95.

This book is a handy guide to the books of the Old Testament, ideal for students or laymen who want to get an brief overview of the Hebrew Bible. It is an unfortunate fact that the Old Testament is ignored in contemporary preaching and that most laymen have very little idea what is in the first two-thirds of their Bible.  This little book will help fill this gap in Christian discipleship.

For each book of the Old Testament, Longman provides a summery of the contents of the book. This is usually the longest section of the chapter, moving quickly through the book. Remarkably, there is no separate outline, something which is expected in this kind of primer.

After the laying out the contents of the book, Longman briefly treats authorship and date. Authorship is not much of an issue for many books of the Old Testament. Isaiah and Jeremiah have longer sections than Joshua. After authorship, there is a section entitled “genre,” although sometimes this goes beyond identifying the genre of a book. For example, Longman deals with minimalist / maximalist views of Israel’s conquest in Joshua. Other times the genre section is only a short paragraph.

Following genre, every book has a unit entitled “Connections: How does this book anticipate the Gospel” In this section Longman ties the content of the book the New Testament story of Jesus. These are not fanciful or strained, but (in my view) represent real connections. When I noticed that these connections were in every chapter, I immediately went to Song of Solomon as a litmus test of how fanciful Longman’s connections to the Gospel might be. Longman is clear that the Song of Solomon is about human love, and he refuses to allegorize the book. He merely states only that Paul used a marriage metaphor in Eph 5:21-33, so this book could “inspire us to think about the intimacy we enjoy in Jesus.”

There are occasional excursuses, one on the purpose of Kings (p. 66-68) and another on “theological history” (p. 84-85). The genre of the Psalms section is a nice introduction to forms of Hebrew poetry.

These introductions are a little more than one expects to read in a good Study Bible (the ESV Study Bible, for example). Personally, I find the introductions too short, but that is because I would rather read Longman’s Introduction to the Old Testament. I suspect for many people this book will be a handy introduction to books of the Bible which are less familiar.

The third book giveaway in May is a brand new copy of the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Dictionary by J. D. Douglas and Merrill C. Tenney, ed. Moises Silva (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, 2011). Using a highly scientific method involving random.org, the winner is:

geobme

Congrats Geobme, I need you to contact me with your shipping information and I will get the book out to you ASAP.  (for email, I am Plong42 at gmail dot com).  On the topic of contact info, last week’s winner LLM needs to contact me with your shipping address. I poked around your blog a bit looking for it, but did not see it.

Stay tuned for another give-away.

I reviewed the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Dictionary about a year ago, check out this link for the full review.

I have finished by May-Term class and now can devote my attention to other important things, such as grading papers from that May-Term class and giving away a few more books on this blog.

To celebrate the middle of the month of May, I am giving away a brand new copy of the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Dictionary by J. D. Douglas and Merrill C. Tenney, ed. Moises Silva (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, 2011.  I reviewed the book a year ago, check out this link for the full review. This new release from Zondervan is more than a re-packaging of the venerable Zondervan Pictorial Bible Dictionary (Merrill, 1963) or the New International Bible Dictionary (Douglas, 1999).

The dictionary contains  more than 7,200 entries covering historical and geographical topics, but also general theological issues as well (Jesus, Sin, Bible translation, etc.)  At 1571 pages, this is a significant tool which will meet the needs of most laymen and most pastors.  While it is impossible to call a book this size “handy,” it will likely be the first book off the shelf for most pastors and lay-teachers.

To have a chance at winning this book, leave a comment mentioning your favorite Bible Dictionary of All Time, or at least your name.  I suppose some other snarky comment will do as well.  I will announce the winner picked at random on May 23, one week from today.

Logos Bible Software announced today they are adding 63 new titles published by Zondervan to the Logos Library.  This includes two volumes of the new Zondervan Exegetical Commentary series, Ephesians by Clint Arnold and Galatians by Thomas Schriener.   Several commonly used textbooks are in this collection including Karen Jobe’s Letters to the Church (Hebrews-Jude), Kosetnberger’s Theology of John’s Gospel, and Marvin Pate’s Writings of John and the Apocalypse. The NIV Application Commentary for the Old Testament is part of this new set of titles, Logos has offered the New Testament series for some time.

I am using Jobes’ Letters to the Church for a class at the moment and three of my students are using the Kindle version.  A major frustration for me is how a student cites a Kindle book since there are no page numbers.  If the book were read in the Logos format, this is not a problem since Logos includes proper page numbers and footnotes.  Perhaps a more difficult problem for Logos to overcome is cost.  The “list price” for Letters to the Church is $44.99, Amazon will sell it for $29.24 new, or $17.99 on Kindle. I am not sure what the Logos final price will be for the book, but it will be hard to beat the Kindle price, even with the generous Logos student discounts.

You can pre-order all 63 for $899.95, which is not quite a 50% discount. There are several smaller bundles available for pre-order at a significant discount.  Some of the collections are odd (McKnight’s Gospel of King Jesus and the Blue Parakeet are in a biblical studies bunlde with Pate and Jobes, although I would not considered these particular McKnight titles “biblical studies.” Kosetenberger  ended up in the Theology Bundle with Michael Horton and Wayne Grudem, probably because the title had “theology” in it.

The addition of a significant number of Zondervan titles is good news for Logos and for those who use an iPad or Andriod tablet for reading.

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