Jean-Léon_Gérôme_-_Diogenes_-_Walters_37131

Describing Diogenes of Sinope (404–323 B.C.) Diogenes Laertius (Lives of Eminent Philosophers 6.24) said:

He was great at pouring scorn on his contemporaries. The school of Euclides he called bilious, and Plato’s lectures waste of time, the performances at the Dionysia great peep-shows for fools, and the demagogues the mob’s lackeys. He used also to say that when he saw physicians, philosophers and pilots at their work, he deemed man the most intelligent of all animals; but when again he saw interpreters of dreams and diviners and those who attended to them, or those who were puffed up with conceit of wealth, he thought no animal more silly. He would continually say that for the conduct of life we need right reason or a halter.

Lives in a barrel? Surrounded by dogs? Pouring scorn on the popular philosophers of his day? Yep, that’s a blogger.