Jacob Cerone and Matthew Fisher, Daily Scriptures: 365 Readings in Hebrew, Greek, and Latin

Cerone, Jacob N. and Matthew C. Fisher. Daily Scriptures: 365 Readings in Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2021. 382 pp. Hb; $34.99.   Link to Eerdmans  

Students who take two years of Greek and a year of Hebrew in seminary often lose touch with those languages because they are not able to read in the original languages every day. The daily grind of language classes is usually replaced by the daily grind of ministry. This collection of biblical readings provides a way for people to keep their language skills sharp through brief daily readings.

Cerone and Fisher, Daily ScriptureIn the introduction to the book the editors explain their goal for the volume is to help students “keep up your languages” but also to “keep you fed in the Word and hopefully spark a desire to explore more deeply how the New Testament at its core relies upon the Old Testament Scriptures.”

For each calendar day, there are two sets of readings. The first is a passage from the Hebrew Bible with the corresponding verse in the Septuagint. The second is a passage from the Greek New Testament with the corresponding verse in the Latin Vulgate. Texts are drawn from Biblica Hebraica Stuttgartensia, Rahlfs-Hanhart, Septuaginta, Nestle-Aland 28, and Weber-Grayson, Biblia Sacra: Vulgata. All verses following the original language rather than the English Bible, but readers can use the Scripture index to find the verse in a modern translation.

Words are marked with superscript numerals are glossed in outer margin of the page. Words appearing less than one hundred times in the Hebrew Bible and the Greek Old Testament are glossed, words appearing less than thirty times in the Greek New Testament or Vulgate are glossed. For the rare Aramaic passages, all the words are glossed (the introduction says two passages from Daniel, but the index only has Daniel 7:13 listed). Irregular verbs are usually parsed. The editors also provide brief notes to help with Context (labeled CH) and Translation (TH), some textual critical notes (TC) and pairing aids (PA). A pairing aid is a short explanation of why the two passages are related. For example, In Matthew 4:9 Jesus responds to Satan by quoting Deuteronomy 6:13, although the quotation is in Matthew 4:10. The editors do not repeat texts in direct quotations. Some readings are marked with chain link indicating the whole context is related, such as 1 Samuel 2:1 and Luke 1:46 (Hannah’s song and the Magnificat). The editors only include one verse from the larger context and encourage the student to read the larger context.

There are thirty-three mostly chronological categories covering both Testaments. The editors kindly shifted readings on the Advent to December. In addition, there is a section on the Holy Spirit after the Resurrection and before the Apostolic Age. Each pair of readings are related, usually allusions rather than quotations. Sometimes the paired texts are thematically related rather than an allusion. Using several cross-reference systems and lists of “Old Testament in the New Testament,” the editors gathered a list and then ordered them in a “salvation-historical arrangement.”

Most books are represented, although there are no readings from Nehemiah, Song of Solomon, Lamentations Zephaniah, Haggai, Titus, Philemon, 2 and 3 John. The main reason for omitting these books is there is no corresponding New Testament passage. There are no apocryphal texts since there are no Hebrew manuscripts for most of those books.

With respect to the physical look and feel of the book, this is not a workbook like Mounce’s Graded Reader, but it is not designed to look like a Bible either. Eerdmans did include a sewn-in ribbon bookmark. Daily readings do not take up a whole page so there is plenty of white space for taking notes and making comments. Rarely does the list of glosses take up the whole outer column.

Conclusion. This volume differs from other similar collections on the market by focusing on biblical Hebrew, Greek and Latin. Jonathan Kline has several volumes of Keep up your Hebrew/Aramaic/Greek in Two Minutes A Day (published by Hendrickson; read my review of his A Proverb a Day in Biblical Hebrew).  Unlike Bill Mounce, A Graded Reader of Biblical Greek (Zondervan, 1996) or Van Pelt and Practico, A Graded Reader of Biblical Hebrew (Zondervan 2006), these readings do not start with easier texts and work up to more difficult passage. This is a result of arranging selections in chronological categories.

Cerone and Fisher’s Daily Scripture is an excellent resource for anyone who wants to refresh their language skills. Since this volume includes both Hebrew and Greek, it is an excellent book for post-seminary biblical language retention, whether one has just finished their language courses, or they are a distant memory. Including the Septuagint and Vulgate add depth to a daily regimen of Bible reading.

 

NB: Thanks to Eerdmans for kindly providing me with a review copy of this book. This did not influence my thoughts regarding the work.

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