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It is March 1, and Jacob Prahlow has posted the Biblical Studies Carnival for February 2017 (number 132 for those who want to collect them all). Jacob has curated an excellent collection of links for this month so be sure to read his Carnival and visit the posts which interest you. Anyone who has bemoaned the death of biblioblogging needs to look over the blogs included in this carnival. There are many excellent posts on a wide variety of topics.

Since the SBL MidWest regional meeting had several sessions on Hebrews, I expected Brian Small to include some of these in his Hebrews Highlights at POLUMEROS KAI POLUTROPOS. If Brian adds any updates I will edit this with a link.

Since Jacob referred to me as “the Godfather of Biblical Studies Carnivals,” let me clarify my completely unofficial role in this process. The idea of a “carnival” seems to have originated among sociology or psychology bloggers. There is a monthly History Carnival, for example. The very first Biblioblog Carnival was hosted by Joel Ng in April of 2005 at Ebla Logs, another blog that has closed. Tyler Williams was the keeper of the Carnival List until at least 2009, here is a list of carnivals at least to December 2009.  He also has an excellent description of what a Carnival ought to look like. Peter Kirby used to keep a complete list on his Biblioblog Top 50, another blog which has ceased to exist (or is now private).

The previous  “keeper of the list” was Jim Linville, professor at University of Lethbridge who blogged at Dr. Jim’s Thinking Shop. Sometime in the summer of 2012 Jim decided to limit his blogging (and the Thinking Shop seems to have disappeared). He asked for a volunteer to cajole people to volunteer to host carnivals, and I appear to be the only fool who showed an interest. I have enjoyed my run as keeper and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

I am always looking for hosts for future carnivals, so please considered volunteering as a host. If you you have hosted in the past, feel free to volunteer again. Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of bibliblogs. Contact me via email (plong42@gmail.com), DM on twitter (@plong42) or a comment on this post and I can contact you.

The upcoming schedule for Carnivals is as follows:

EDIT: Jeff Carter volunteered for May and Jim West for November. I am looking for September and October 2017. If you are into long range planning and want to volunteer for a 2018 date, just let me know.

Finally, I have a FlipBoard Magazine dedicated to biblical studies. You can use the web version or follow me using FlipBoard on your iOS or Android devices. I really enjoy the iPad version of FlipBoard, so check it out. You can always follow me on twitter, @plong42.

BiblioBlogger Carnival Barker?

BiblioBlogger Carnival Barker?

Cassandra Farrin hosts the January 2017 Biblical Studies Carnival at her Ethics & Early Christianity Blog hosted by the Westar Institute. In addition to the usual categories, Cassandra has a collection of links to biblioblogs (and others) commenting on Religion, Media & the US Presidential Election. I might have filed this under Apocalyptic and the End of the World, but her category works too.

Brian Small has a few Hebrews Highlights for January 2017 at his Hebrews themed blog, POLUMEROS KAI POLUTROPOS. I noticed Brian is part of a Hebrews group at the upcoming Midwest SBL meetings (now in South Bend, Indiana). I hope to attend these sessions discussing ““What Is Hebrews?”

I am always looking for hosts for future carnivals, so please considered volunteering as a host. If you you have hosted in the past, feel free to volunteer again. Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of bibliblogs. Contact me via email (plong42@gmail.com), DM on twitter (@plong42) or a comment on this post and I can contact you.

The upcoming schedule for Carnivals is as follows:

Obviously I am still looking for volunteers for March – June 2016, and then the rest of the year.

Finally, I have a FlipBoard Magazine dedicated to biblical studies. You can use the web version or follow me using FlipBoard on your iOS or Android devices. I really enjoy the iPad version of FlipBoard, so check it out. You can always follow me on twitter, @plong42.

jennifer-guoJennifer Guo hosts a festive holiday carnival complete with snow and  “inaugurated eschatology.” There are many links to blogs from old veterans to new blogs from graduate students.  Head over to Jennifer’s blog and start your new year right by reading a few new blogs this year.

In his final carnival, Jim West bemoans the death of biblioblogging. He claims (rightly) “the first generation of bloggers have either succumbed to irregular posting or post nothing at all anymore” but also that anyone blogging on biblical or theological topics have “withered into dullness.” What is more, he claims that “Bibliobloggers have, by and large, forsaken their posts.”

I think Jim is overreacting and acting more curmudgeonly than usual. Jennifer’s carnival demonstrates there are many excellent posts by quality scholars (McKnight, Hurtado, Keener, Keith, Bird, Gupta) as well as graduate students using their blogs as an extension of their studies (Jacob Prahlow, William Ross, Jennifer Guo, Lindsay Kennedy, Biblical Reasoning). Jim is correct some of the older bloggers have moved on, but “life happens.” Yet veteran blogger Jim Davilla points out his blog “PaleoJudaica has tallied up 1822 posts for the year (including this one), considerably more than any previous year since it began back in 2003.” Virtually all of PaleoJudaica’s links are to important posts around the web, making me wonder who has in fact “forsaken their posts.”

As for conference participation, another veteran blogger Daniel O. McClellan has already posted is SBL 2017 proposal for discussion. Although Daniel has posted less frequently in the last year, virtually all his posts concern conferences. Torrey Seland reported on Philo, Wisdom and Apocalypticism at the 2016 SBL meetings.  William Ross had an excellent review of the 2016 ETS Septuagint consultation. Jim has linked to these reports, so I am not sure why he thinks they do not exist.

I agree there is cause for concern when quality bloggers stop posting. But Brian LePort said something similar on his now-shuttered Near Emmaus blog in 2014, and Claude Mariottini offered a very thoughtful response. In fact, I have the same sort of hand-wringing in a 2011 post (Educating Evangelicals and BiblioBlogs). Jim is simply wrong to dismiss people because there only starting blogging in the last year.

If you have an opinion on this so-called death of the biblioblogs, please leave a comment on this discussion below.

carnival-volunteersI would like to see a few new bloggers volunteer to host a Carnival. It is not too late to volunteer to host a Carnival in 2017. If you you have hosted in the past, feel free to volunteer again. Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of bibliblogs. Contact me via email (plong42@gmail.com), DM on twitter (@plong42) or a comment on this post and I can contact you.

The upcoming schedule for Carnivals is as follows:

Obviously I am still looking for volunteers for March – June 2016, and then the rest of the year.

Finally, I have a FlipBoard Magazine dedicated to biblical studies. You can use the web version or follow me using FlipBoard on your iOS or Android devices. I really enjoy the iPad version of FlipBoard, so check it out. You can always follow me on twitter, @plong42.

Image resultJim West is the host of the 129th Biblical Studies Carnival for November 2016. His carnival is all about the annual meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature. Jim seems to have had a good time at SBL, at least he took a lot of pictures. Brian Small has report on the SBL Hebrews section.

Although the old BiblioBlog top 50 has not been updated in a very long time, Jeremy Myers posted his “Top 100 Christian Blogs.” Reading Acts comes in at #48 on a list that includes a wide variety of less-than-scholarly blogs (and a few barely active blogs).

The next carnival host is Jennifer Guo. You can tweet her nominations for the December Carnival (@jenniferguo). In January 2017 (posted February 1) Cassandra Farrin will host the Carnival at Ethics and Early Christianity.

If you would like to host a Carnival, please contact me. It is not too early to volunteer to host a Carnival in 2017. If you you have hosted in the past, feel free to volunteer again. Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of bibliblogs. Contact me via email (plong42@gmail.com), DM on twitter (@plong42) or a comment on this post and I can contact you.

[Update 12/2 – Jacob Prahlow  @prahlowjacob volunteered for  February 2017 (Due March 1) and Reuben Rus from Ayuda Ministerial/Resources for Ministry for July 2017 (Due August 1). I still need March – June 2016.]

Finally, I have a FlipBoard Magazine dedicated to biblical studies. You can use the web version or follow me using FlipBoard on your iOS or Android devices. I really enjoy the iPad version of FlipBoard, so check it out. You can always follow me on twitter, @plong42.

Bob MacDonald has done a remarkable job collecting and organizing the best of the BiblioBlogs this month at at his blog Dust.  Click all the links, support the scholars who do good work and share it on their blogs each month.

In other Biblioblog news, Jim West devotes his alt-carnival to his deep love and affection for Donald Trump, at least in pumpkin form. James McGrath has a collection of links on Christology from October and Brian Small has a brief Hebrews Highlights.

Although the old BiblioBlog top 50 has not been updated in a very long time, Jeremy Myers posted his “Top 100 Christian Blogs” last week. Reading Acts was an honorable mention in 2014, #77 in 2015, and this year #48. Meyers has created a good list of blogs, although many of the blogs on this list are less-than-scholarly and a few are rarely updated.

Jim West will be hosting the unified Carnival next month, likely reporting on the SBL annual meeting in San Antonio. If you have suggestions for Jim, follow him on twitter, @drjewest, or meet him at one of the AAR meditation sessions in San Antonio.

If you would like to host a Carnival, please contact me. It is not too early to volunteer to host a Carnival in 2017. If you you have hosted in the past, feel free to volunteer again. Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of bibliblogs. Contact me via email (plong42@gmail.com), DM on twitter (@plong42) or a comment on this post and I can contact you.

Finally, I have a FlipBoard Magazine dedicated to biblical studies. You can use the web version or follow me using FlipBoard on your iOS or Android devices. I really enjoy the iPad version of FlipBoard, so check it out. You can always follow me on twitter, @plong42.

york-bloggers

York Bloggers Gathering to Carnival

Randy McCracken (@randalmccracken) hosts the September Biblical Studies Carnival at Bible Study with Randy. Randy is a first time host, so be gentle.

Randy hails from the ancient city of York, England, a city Randy points out is the “very city where Constantine himself was proclaimed Emperor.” He has a nice collection of posts concerning the “trending topic of plagiarism” in biblical scholarship. This is the reason I have extra quote marks in this paragraph, just in case.

Jim West’s Alt-Carnival brings you posts from all seven continents, although Antarctica is severely under-represented.

If you use FlipBoard to read blogs, consider following my Biblical Studies magazine. The Web-based version is OK, but Flipboard is an essential app for your iOS device. I use it on my iPad for news and other special interests. You can also follow me on twitter, @plong42 (or click the link in the sidebar).

The next few carnivals will be hosted by:

I have included a link to the site hosting as well as a twitter account so you can nominate posts during the month by sending them directly to the host. If you do not have a twitter account, contact the host via their blog.

Jim West Looking for Bloggers in Antarctica

Jim West Looking for Bloggers in Antarctica

As always I am looking for volunteers for the the 2017 Carnival Season. There are several people who have hosted in the past that could take a month, don’t wait for me to ask you (or beg you) to participate.

Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of BibliBlogs.

Please email me or direct message on Twitter (@plong42). You can also leave a comment with your contact info and I will get back to you.

 

i-still-have-no-idea-what-im-doingThe August Biblical Studies Carnival is up at Monday Morning Theologian, hosted by Kevin Turner (who calls himself J.K. on his blog). Kevin claims to be an amateur, but he has collected a great list of links. Go click all the links and find out what the BiblioBloggers were going in August.

Jim West’s Alt-Carnival is dedicated to Emil Brunner, for whom August was a special month, apparently. So unless you are Emil Brunner, you are probably not going to be including in Jim’s carnival. It is interesting reading, so go and check it out.

If you use FlipBoard to read blogs, consider following my Biblical Studies magazine. The Web-based version is OK, but Flipboard is an essential app for your iOS device. I use it on my iPad for news and other special interests. You can also follow me on twitter, @plong42 (or click the link in the sidebar).

The next few carnivals will be hosted by:

I have included a link to the site hosting as well as a twitter account so you can nominate posts during the month by sending them directly to the host. If you do not have a twitter account, contact the host via their blog.

As always I am looking for volunteers for the the 2017 Carnival Season. Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of BibliBlogs. Please email me  (plong42 at gmail.com) or direct message on Twitter (@plong42). You can also leave a comment here with your contact info and I will get back to you.

 

PokGoSummer is always slow time for Biblioblogs. Since this was the hottest July ever in the history of the universe, so bloggers have crawled back under their rocks…or are excavating, like Andrew King (@aking443) or outside playing Pokemon Go. Seems everyone is playing this new mind-numbing game. Even Christianity Today is helping churches cash in on the fad, I expect to hear about “Jim West’s Church of Fun and Pokemon” soon.

Perhaps biblio-bloggers were was stunned to silence after the two presidential conventions. The un-stunable Wayne Grudem came out in support of Donald Trump in an op-ed piece “Why Voting for Donald Trump Is a Morally Good Choice” on TownHall, giving rise to responses from Matthew Boedy and many others. The best response, of course, was from the Donald himself, who declared that the Bible is not really a Christian. Yes, I am fully aware the Babylon Bee is a fake-news site, but sometimes fake news is better than real news.

Here is the upcoming Carnival Schedule. I always try to mix in some newer bloggers with a few carnival veterans. please notice I need a volunteer for October (due Nov 1), or if you are the type to plan ahead, any month in 2017 is open. Please contact me ASAP (@plong42 or plong42 at gmail.com, or leave a comment and I can contact you).

  • August 2016  (Due September 1) – Kevin Turner, @TheJKTurner
  • September 2016 (October 1) – Randy McCracken, Bible Study with Randy, @randalmccracken
  • October 2016 (November 1) –
  • November 2016 (December 1) – Jim West
  • December 2016 (January 1) – Jennifer Guo, @jenniferguo

If are so inclined, follow me on Twitter (@plong42), or on the Flipboard Biblical Studies Magazine, especially nice for iPad or iPhone. I also have a few papers on Academia.edu if you are using that excellent site.

Old Testament

 

Philistine-grave

There was some archaeology news this month, including buzz over the Philistine graveyard discovered at Ashkelon, and some commentary from Aren Maier. Ferrell Jenkins has an encounter with Jonah and the great fish. Jenkins also had a nice summary of the excavations at Tel Gath this summer and a short discussion of the Ark of the Covenant at Kiriath-jearim.

The Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament 5.1 was published on July 23, download a PDF copy.

Bob MacDonald on Deuteronomy 27.

Claude Mariottini on Israel in Exile.

There were several blogs on the Writings this month, Bob MacDonald has notes on Job 30 and  Job 31. According to the Jewish Journal, Ruth’s conversion would not be accepted today. Extracted from Iain Duguid’s Song of Songs in the Reformed Expository Commentary series,  The 4 Most Popular Ways to Read the Song of Songs. That Jeff Carter left a few notes on Psalm 138.

Why Learn Ugaritic? Asks Zondervan, which has an Ugaritic textbook for sale. Brian Davidson discusses learning Latin, and Jacob Cerone had a nice post entitled “So You Want To Learn German?” Some good advice for those in a PhD program.

Second Temple Literature

 

Stephen Bedard began a series on the Apocrypha, including 1 Maccabees,   Psalm 151 and The Prayer of Manasseh?”

Here at Reading Acts, I finished a series on 1 Enoch, 2 Enoch, 3 Enoch and began the Sibylline Oracles. I hope to finish off 2 Baruch and 4 Ezra before the end of the summer.

New Testament  

 

Wine

James Tabor, A Wedding at Cana–Whose and Where?

Michael Kruger examines a Deep Irony in the New Perspective on Paul: Who’s Really Influenced by Their Cultural Situation? A Deep Irony in the New Perspective on Paul.

The Regalia of Artemis Ephesia from Marg Mowczko’s New Life blog.

David Capes, in anticipation of a second edition of his book, Rediscovering Paul (IVP), Capes is re-writing a chapter on Paul’s theology and (re)reading N. T. Wright’s two volume Paul and the Faithfulness of God (Fortress, 2013). The result is “The (W)right Way to Read Paul.” 

Fred Butler blogs at Hip & Thigh, Idol Meat and Christian Liberty: An Overview of 1 Corinthians 8-10.

Andy Naselli on Women in the Church: An Interpretation and Application of 1 Timothy 2:9–15.

There seemed to be more posts on Textual Criticism this month that usual. Peter Gurry and Evangelical Textual Criticism point out the Vatican has made color images of P72 and P75 available online. Dirk Jongkind has a little more on textual criticism, “What to do when a word is no longer in your manuscript?”  On his Text of the Gospels blog, James Snapp commented on Two Doctrinally Significant Variants in One Verse, Matthew 1:18 and another on Hand-to-Hand Combat: Codex B vs. Minuscule 496.

Theology

 

easy-answers

 

Based on his reading of Carl Trueman’s The Creedal Imperative, Scot McKnight asks, “Do We Need Creeds?”

Marg Mowczko also contributed two posts on Hell: Paul, James, and Jesus on Hell (Gehenna) and Eternal Torment, Eternal Fire, Eternal Death?

Interacting with John S. Hammett. 40 Questions about Baptism and the Lord’s Supper, Andy Naselli asks “Are Baptism and the Lord’s Supper Only for Churches?”

Fred Butler, Jesus and Wine Theology and the Reformed Hermeneutic.

Ian Paul discusses “The lost virtue of naiveté” and the sending of the 72 in Luke 10 at Psephizo.

Scot McKnight shares some of his favorite quotes from Elie Wiesel, who died on July 3.

Book Reviews

 

book-review

In publishing news, Eerdmans announced new editors for the Two Horizons New Testament Commentary series, Robert Wall and Stephen Fowl, replacing Max Turner and Joel B. Green.

Oliver Crisp and Fred Sanders, eds., Locating Atonement, (Zondervan, 2015), reviewed by Spencer Robinson at Spoiled Milks.

Joshua Jipp, Christ is King: Paul’s Royal Ideology (Fortress, 2015), reviewed by Spencer Robinson at Spoiled Milks.

Carol Hill, Gregg Davidson, Tim Helble, and Wayne Ranney, eds. The Grand Canyon, Monument to an Ancient Earth: Can Noah’s Flood Explain the Grand Canyon? (Kregel, 2016), reviewed by Phillip Long.

David Bentley Hart, A Splendid Wickedness and Other Essays (Eerdmans, 2016), reviewed by Phillip Long.

Jeffrey Bingham, and Glenn R. Kreider, eds. Eschatology: Biblical, Historical, and Practical Approaches (Kregel, 2016), reviewed by Phillip Long.

Michael Bird, What Christians Ought to Believe (Zondervan, 2016), reviewed by Jennifer Guo.

Silvia Luraghi and Claudia Parodi, eds. The Bloomsbury Companion to Syntax (Bloomsbury Academic, 2013), reviewed at Exegetical Tools.

Reminder

 

I need a volunteer for October (due Nov 1), or if you are the type to plan ahead, any month in 2017 is open. Please contact me ASAP (@plong42 or plong42 at gmail.com, or leave a comment and I can contact you).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CarnivalKris Lyle has posted the June 2016 Bibliblog Carnival has arrived at Old School Script. Kris has done a great job gathering links in the month of June, including the “kerfuffle over Trinitarian theology amongst evangelicals.” Everyone should find something of interest, go check it out. Click all the links and let Kris know he did a great job.

In other Biblioblog news, Jim West puts the P in pool for his his Avignonian Carnival, this time giving as a “best of” for each day.  Peter Kirby’s Christian Origins is now aggregating biblioblogs and providing a nice digest of links for the week categorized into “Top 20 Biblical Commentary Posts,”  “Top 15 Biblical Criticism Posts” and “Radical Criticism Posts.” The site also indexes comments. Peter has not been blogging much and the top 50 list seems dormant again. Is there anyone out there who wants to re-boot a quarterly top fifty list?

In personal blog news, I started a Biblical Studies Flipboard Magazine. If you are using Flipboard on your iPad or phone, feel free to follow me. I also have a few papers on Academia.edu if you are using that excellent site.

Looking ahead to future Biblioblog Carnivals, I do not have a volunteer for July carnival yet. If you are interested, please let me know ASAP. I have a couple of asks out, but no one has responded  yet. If someone wants to take October, I can do July myself.

August 2016 – Kevin Turner, Monday Morning Theologian, @TheJKTurner
September 2016 – Randy McCracken, Bible Study with Randy, @randalmccracken
October 2016 – Phillip Long, Reading Acts, @plong42
November 2016 – Jim West, Zwinglius Redivivus, @drjewest
December 2016 – Jennifer Guo, @jenniferguo

Carnivals are a great way to attract attention to your site if you are new blogger, but more importantly it gives you a chance to highlight the best and the brightest in the world of bibliblogs.  If you would like to host a Carnival in 2015 or early 2016, send me an email (plong42@gmail.com), on DM on twitter (@plong42) or a comment on this post and I can contact you.

carnivalThe June Biblioblog Carnival will be hosted by Kris Lyle  and Old School Script. This is a relatively new blog and Kris has been posting quite a bit of useful Contact Kris on this blog or  via twitter @KristopherLyle. I am sure he is nearly finished selecting his links, but if you have something you think is carnival worthy, send Brian a link. What have you read this month that was challenging, simulating, or maybe even a bit strange? This is a good time to promote a less well-known blog you enjoy, or you can send a link to your own work.

Some readers may not know what a “blog carnival” is. Simply, a Blog Carnival is a collection of links on a particular topic for a given period. I think the idea of a blog carnival first developed out of psychology or sociology blogs, but the first BiblioBlog carnival was Joel Ng at Ebla Logs in March 2005.

I took over as the “keeper of the list” from Dr Jim Linville in August of 2012. Basically that means I find volunteers to host the carnival. In fact, I am always looking for volunteers to host future carnivals!  Right now I have June covered, but I need someone for July (due Aug 1) and August (due Sept 1). I know there are a few relatively new bloggers who might like the chance to host, now is the time!

Hosting a carnival is a great way to draw readers to your blog and it is really fun to do. Contact me either by leaving a comment here, or sending me an email (plong42 at gmail.com) or a direct message via twitter (@plong42).

 

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