Biblical Studies Carnival for August 2019

Like John the Baptist crying out in the desert, the Amateur Exegete, has posted the August 2019 Biblical Studies Carnival. Although he has been blogging for some time, I really do not know his name, so I’ll just say AmatEx did a good job on his rookie carnival. Although he may not recall what happened to John the Baptist as a result of all that crying out in the wilderness.

Brian Small posted a short Hebrews Highlights, although Hebrews posts have been slim recently. Abram K-J stirred from his blogging slumber to once again post on the Septuagint. I told him recently I missed his monthly Septuagint Soiree.

Since I took over as the “keeper of the list” of Biblical Studies Carnivals in August 2012, I have tried to encourage new bloggers to host carnivals. I have tried to draw in more women as hosts, although that has not always been successful. If you are a new blogger, a graduate student or established scholar who is actively blogging, I would love to have you host a future carnival. Contact me if you are interested or have questions. Seriously….PLEASE email me  (plong42 at gmail.com) or direct message on Twitter (@plong42) to volunteer. You can also leave a comment here with your contact info and I will get back to you.

December 2019 is still open and I would like to start setting up hosts for 2020. If you are a veteran biblioblogger (who knows what that used to mean) or a new blogger/podcaster (or what ever the kids are calling it these days), hosting the Biblical Studies carnival is a great way to draw attention to your work. To quote Palpatine of Bibliobloggers Jim West, “It’s Fun.” So consider hosting in the near future.

You can review older carnivals by browsing this tag. Follow me on twitter (@plong42) if you are into that sort of thing. I have a Biblical Studies magazine on FlipBoard, an essential app for your iOS device. I use it on my iPad for news and other special interests (including biblioblogs).

Biblical Studies Carnival for July 2019

Lindsay Kennedy at My Digital Seminary posted the Biblical Studies Carnival for July. Lindsay was a bit concerned his carnival was “a little more sparse than I would have liked,: but July is a slower time for academic bloggers. Nevertheless, he does a great job finding quite a few excellent academic posts this month. He begins with an update on Larry Hurtado, including a heartfelt tribute to Hurtado by Nick Norelli. He has a link to some discussion of the supposed first-century Mark fragment, a dumpster fire which continues to burn hot this summer. There are good sections for book reviews and podcasts as well.

Since I took over as the “keeper of the list” of Biblical Studies Carnivals in August 2012, I have tried to encourage new bloggers to host carnivals. I have tried to draw in more women as hosts, although that has not always been successful. If you are a new blogger, a graduate student or established scholar who is actively blogging, I would love to have you host a future carnival. Contact me if you are interested or have questions. Seriously….PLEASE email me  (plong42 at gmail.com) or direct message on Twitter (@plong42) to volunteer. You can also leave a comment here with your contact info and I will get back to you.

As you can see there are some gaps in the schedule and there is no one for the rest of the year after (November and December open) and I would like to start getting hosts for 2020. Hosting the carnival is a great way to draw attention to your work and to quote Jim West, “It’s Fun.” So consider hosting in the near future.

You can also review older carnivals by browsing this tag. Follow me on twitter (@plong42) if you are into that sort of thing. I have a Biblical Studies magazine on FlipBoard, an essential app for your iOS device. I use it on my iPad for news and other special interests (including biblioblogs).

Biblical Studies Carnival 161 (June 2019)

Usually June, July and August are slow days for bibliobloggers since Academics head for the beach as soon as school ends and refuse to do any work until September, but there were many excellent posts in June. Carnival Veteran Jim West has posted the June 2019 Biblical Studies Carnival at Zwingli Redivivus.Jim has a hot carnival for these hot days of summer. Early summer has been extremely warm. Europe is melting, the French are swimming in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, and in Spain, a pile of chicken poop sparked a wildfire.

Speaking of gigantic chicken poop fires, the big news this month is the twisted tale of “First Century” Mark, Dirk Obbink, and Hobby Lobby. Jim has links to several other blogs commenting on this mess, but check out Jerry Pattengale’s long piece in Christianity Today, The ‘First-Century Mark’ Saga from Inside the Room.

Since I took over as the “keeper of the list” of Biblical Studies Carnivals in August 2012, I have tried to encourage new bloggers to host carnivals. I have tried to draw in more women as hosts, although that has not always been successful. If you are a new blogger, a graduate student or established scholar who is actively blogging, I would love to have you host a future carnival. Contact me if you are interested or have questions. Seriously….PLEASE email me  (plong42 at gmail.com) or direct message on Twitter (@plong42) to volunteer. You can also leave a comment here with your contact info and I will get back to you.

As you can see there are some gaps in the schedule and there is no one for the rest of the year after (November and December open) and I would like to start getting hosts for 2020. Hosting the carnival is a great way to draw attention to your work and to quote Jim West, “It’s Fun.” So consider hosting in the near future.

You can also review older carnivals by browsing this tag. Follow me on twitter (@plong42) if you are into that sort of thing. I have a Biblical Studies magazine on Flipboard, an essential app for your iOS device. I use it on my iPad for news and other special interests (including biblioblogs).

Grace Christian University Tour of Israel and Jordan 2019

For the next two weeks I am leading a (mostly) student group from Grace Christian University on a tour of Israel and Jordan. This is my ninth trip leading a group to Israel, and this time I have 27 students and parents traveling with me.This is a diverse group and I look forward to getting to know the whole group as we travel together. I am doing things a little differently than previous years. First, I am using Tutku Tours for the first time in Israel. I have traveled in Turkey, Greece and Egypt with them and had excellent trips. I have two tours planned with Tutku in 2020, if you are interested in my “Missionary Journeys of Paul” tour in March 2020, check out the brochure on the Tutku website. If you have questions about the 2020 tour, contact me directly via email or a direct message on twitter @plong42

Mount of Olives

Mount of Olives, May 2017

Days one and two are travel from Grace to Chicago, a flight through Frankfurt to Tel Aviv. By Wednesday we will be in the Old City. I include a basic itinerary of the trip here, I plan on posting each day, so check back often  for updates. There is a tab near the top of this page with posts from previous trips and two videos.

Beginning on May 1 we will be in Jerusalem. We start the tour by walking from our hotel to the Garden Tomb, then to the Jaffa Gate and a visit to the Church of Holy Sepulcher. We will be touring the Temple Tunnel, the Western Wall and the Davidson Archaeological Park on the Southern wall of the Temple.

On Thursday May 2 we will spend the morning at the Yad VaShem, the Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem We will spend the afternoon at the Israel National Museum to see the Dead Sea Scrolls at the Shrine of the Book, the Jerusalem Model, and the Archaeology Wing of the Museum.

On Friday May 3 we begin on the Mount of Olives, looking across the Kidron Valley. Walking down the Mount we will visit Domiunis Flevit (where Jesus wept over Jerusalem), the Garden of Gethsemane and the Church of All Nations. We will walk across the Kidron Valley past Absalom’s tomb and up to the City of David and Hezekiah’s tunnel and the pool of Siloam.

On May 4 we heard north to Galilee, driving from Jerusalem to Caesarea, Megiddo, through Nazareth to the Sea of Galilee to finally arrive at Maagan Holiday Village in the late afternoon. On Sunday May 5 Galilee we will start the day at Mount Arbel overlooking the Sea of Galillee and then visit the synagogue at Magdal, the Mount of Beatitudes, Capernaum, and other sites Jesus.

We cross the border to Jordan on May 6 and visit Jerash and Mount Mt. Nebo on our way to Petra. Jerash for a tour of this spectacular Roman city.  Tuesday May 7 we will spend the day at Petra, walking the Suq to the famous Al Khazneh or Treasury at Petra. On Wednesday May 8 we cross back into Israel at Aqaba visiting Eilat for a swim in the Red Sea, then a drive through the Arabah, a visit to Tamar Biblical Park.

Thursday May 9 starts with a visit to the Nabatean trading village Mamshit, Tel Arad, and the highlight of the day, Masada, the famous fortress built by King Herod and the site of the last stand of the Jewish zealots in the first Jewish War against Rome.

On Friday May 10 we will start the day with a swim in the Dead Sea, then on to the Ein Gedi Nature Reserve, hiking to the waterfall in Ein Gedi where David hid from King Saul, then a visit at Qumran, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found. We will finish out the day with some shopping in the Old City in Jerusalem before driving to Tel Aviv for our last night in Israel.

All of these places are important historical and cultural sites, but they also challenge students to think more deeply about the story of the Bible an will encourage them in their walk with God. Plan on following along with our adventures as I post updates Reading Acts each day.

The Garden Tomb

At the Garden Tomb in May 2017

 

 

Biblical Studies Carnival 157 (March 2019)

Spencer Robinson posted the March 2019 Biblical Studies Carnival at Spoiled Milks. Remember, it is April 1, so expect the unexpected. “Nothing says ‘fun,’ ‘excitement,’ and ‘unemployment’ like biblical studies.”Perhaps he needed to add a trigger warning for “Jim West’s new swimsuit calendar,” but otherwise Spencer has collected some very good posts for the month of March.

Since I took over as the “keeper of the list” of Biblical Studies Carnivals in August 2012, I have tried to get new people to host carnivals, often hosts who are on opposite sides of the spectrum with respect to assumptions about biblical studies (look at a few of the upcoming hosts for example). I have tried to draw in more women as hosts, although that has not always been successful. I have asked at least two people to do an international carnival, highlight Spanish language blogs for example, but nothing has come of that either.

If you are a new blogger, a graduate student or established scholar who is actively blogging, I would love to have you host a future carnival.

As you can see there are some gaps in the schedule and there is no one for the rest of the year after (September through December are wide open). I have a few asks out there, but there is still time for you to volunteer as Carnival Host. Hosting the carnival is a great way to draw attention to your work, so consider hosting in the near future.

Seriously….PLEASE email me  (plong42 at gmail.com) or direct message on Twitter (@plong42) to volunteer. You can also leave a comment here with your contact info and I will get back to you.

You can also review older carnivals by browsing this tag. Follow me on twitter (@plong42) if you are into that sort of thing. I have a Biblical Studies magazine on Flipboard, an essential app for your iOS device. I use it on my iPad for news and other special interests (including biblioblogs).

Book Giveaway Winner – James L. Papandrea, A Week in the Life of Rome

Last week I offered my extra copy of James L. Papandrea, A Week in the Life of Rome (Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP Academic, 2019) to one of the readers of this blog. I do this from time to time when I have an extra copy of something I think people might like. Sometimes I buy a book and discover later I already had a copy (people often associate this with impending old age, but I blame almost anything else). I said I would give it away yesterday, but I got busy with other things and completely forgot.

There were twenty-one entries this time, and I was happy to see several new names from previous giveaways. I sorted the names randomly and then used random.org to generate the winner. And the winner is….

Matt Lantz

Everyone congratulate Matt (or curse his luck). Matt, contact me via plong at gmail.com or a direct message on Twitter (@plong42) with a mailing address and I will get this right out to you.

About the book: Since the “week in the life of” series are novels by biblical scholars, about half the book is academic side-notes explaining the background details of the story. I have read all three of the currently available volumes and find them to be entertaining and easy reading. These are not academic books, but they do present the history and archaeology of the Roman world for a popular audience. I reviewed the book a few weeks ago, concluding “this book offers an entertaining insight into the relationship of Christianity and Rome in the mid-first century. Papandrea draws out the agonizing decisions a person living in the Roman world would have to make in order to be a Christian in an entirely pagan world. The book will be an easy introduction for readers interested in the background of the Roman world and early Christianity.”

 

Book Giveaway – James L. Papandrea, A Week in the Life of Rome

I have an extra copy of James L. Papandrea, A Week in the Life of Rome (Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP Academic, 2019). This is the latest addition to IVP Academic’s “A Week in the Life of” series, which now includes Ben Witherington’s A Week in the Life of Corinth (2012) and Gary M. Burge, A Week in the Life of a Roman Centurion (2015). John Byron, A Week in the Life of a Slave is coming in July 2019.

Since the “week in the life of” series are novels by biblical scholars, about half the book is academic side-notes explaining the background details of the story. I have read all three of the currently available volumes and find them to be entertaining and easy reading. These are not academic books, but they do present the history and archaeology of the Roman world for a popular audience. I reviewed the book a few weeks ago, concluding “this book offers an entertaining insight into the relationship of Christianity and Rome in the mid-first century. Papandrea draws out the agonizing decisions a person living in the Roman world would have to make in order to be a Christian in an entirely pagan world. The book will be an easy introduction for readers interested in the background of the Roman world and early Christianity.”

To have a chance at winning this book, leave a comment with your name so I can contact you if you win. I will randomize the names from the comments and select one winner at random.

I will announce the winner picked at random on March 26, 2019 (one week from now). Good Luck!