Acts 9:19-22 – Paul in Damascus

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After Paul recovers from his blindness, we are told that he spends “some days” with the disciples in Damascus.  Paul immediately begins his attempts at evangelism in the Diaspora synagogues, proclaiming that Jesus is the “Son of God” (verse 20).  Notice that he immediately begins this preaching, there is no lengthy period of time after his experience before he announces to the synagogues that Jesus was in fact the Messiah.  Luke describes the content of Paul’s preaching as “Jesus is the Son of God” and “Jesus is the Messiah.”  That Jesus is the Son of God resonates with Psalm 2, a text which has already been used by Peter at Pentecost to show that Jesus is the Messiah.

This preaching “agitates” the synagogues.  The verb here (συγχέω) has the sense of amazement and surprise, but can be used to describe confusion of a crowd about to riot (Acts 19:29, variant text, 21:27).  What agitates the synagogues is that Paul is succeeding in proving Jesus is the Christ.  Paul is able to teach from the scripture, through the Holy Spirit, in such a way that convinces people.  This may not imply the believed, but it was impossible to argue against Paul’s evidence.

Where did Paul get this evidence?  On the one hand, boldness in preaching is one of Luke’s evidences that an individual is yielded to the Holy Spirit.  Like Peter before the Sanhedrin, Paul is filled with the Holy Spirit and boldly speaks the message of Jesus.  A second source for his preaching is likely the preaching of Peter, or better, Stephen in the Synagogue.  Undoubtedly Paul has been arguing with Stephen and other Hellenists in the Synagogue for some time, Paul now accepts their arguments and begins to extend them to other scripture.  A third source may be Paul’s own thinking about the Messiah and the Messianic age as a well-trained rabbi.  As observed in the last few posts, Paul does not go from totally ignorant of God to a faithful follower of Jesus.  He was already aware of messianic texts and methods of argument in rabbinic discussions as well as how to present scripture in a synagogue context.  Paul took what he already knew to be the truth and ran it through the filter of the resurrected Jesus and preached that Gospel in the synagogues in Damascus.

Once again, Luke presents powerful preaching and excellent scholarship working together to convince people of the truth of the Gospel.  Paul is extremely confrontational – he goes right to the people who likely wanted the Jesus Community to be silent and announces that he is one of them!   This is a boldness which is a direct result of the encounter with Jesus and the filling of the Holy Spirit.